Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Gerits, Anton: Books, Friends and Bibliophilia: Reminiscences of an Antiquarian Bookseller. Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2004. 8vo., pp. ix, [i], 402. Burgundy cloth, gilt title to spine, almost fine. Gerits' autobiography, which also offers an overview of the antiquarian book trade in Europe from 1950 onwards.   Ref: 51635 
£45
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Gleason, J.H.: The Justices of the Peace in England 1558-1640. A Later Eirenarcha. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1969. 8vp., pp. xvi, 285, [i] + plates. Blue cloth, gilt title to spine. Top edge dusty, very good overall.   Ref: 51621 
£15
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Graves, Wallace: Trixie. A Novel. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1969. First edition, author inscribed. 8vo., pp. [iv], 333, [i]. Yellow cloth, silver title to spine with pink flower decoration, 'Diary' in pink to upper board, top edge yellow. Top and fore- edges foxed but still very good. Author's inscription to 'Mary and Martin' to ffep.   Ref: 51651 
£60
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Green, John Richard: Stray Studies from England and Italy. London: Macmillan and Co., 1876. First edition. 8vo., pp. 421, [iii]. Blue cloth, gilt title to spine and motif to upper board, edges uncut. A little rubbed, corners bumped, endpapers toned but still a good sound copy. Ownership inscription of Charles Wm. Hall to title-page.   Ref: 51673 
£15
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Guillery, Peter: (Donald, Andrew; Kendall, Derek, illus.:) The Small House in Eighteenth-Century London: A Social and Architectural History. Yale University Press in association with English Heritage: for The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies i 2004. Folio (280 x 220mm), pp. vii, [i], 351, [i]. Many photographic illustrations (a few in colour), maps and plans. Red cloth, gilt title to spine. Top corner of upper board bumped, otherwise very good.   Ref: 51740 
£30
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Hale, J. R. (ed.): Renaissance Venice. Totowa: Rowman and Littlefield, 1973. First edition. 8vo., pp. 483. Blue cloth, gilt armorial stamp to upper board. Spine marginally cocked. Wear to edges of boards. Dusting and light spotting to edges, very good. Dustwrapper, several small tears to edges, a couple with loss, crease to spine and some light markings, good. Ownership inscription of Lauro Martines to ffep, his pen and pencil underlining and annotations throughout. Featuring contributions from English, Italian and American historians, ranging in approach from computer-aided demographic study to psychologically oriented social analysis. Their work covers the late fourteenth to late sixteenth century.   Ref: 45569 
£75
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Home, Francis: Medical Facts and Experiments. London: A. Millar [...] and A. Kincaid and J. Bell at Edinburgh, 1759. First edition. 8vo., pp.[viii], 288. A little spotting and patchy toning, paper flaw causing a short tear to fore-edge margin pp.161-2. 20th-century library binding, quarter tan morocco with tan arbelave buckram boards, raised bands and red gilt title label to spine, endpapers renewed, hinges reinforced with cloth. Spine rubbed and a little faded with some evidence of a removed label at tail, very good overall. To the front paste-down and title-page, inkstamps (and 'Cancelled' stamp) from the National Institute for Medical Research Council Library; library label to ffep. Pasted to the verso of a replacement blank, facing the title-page, a clipped-out piece of original endpaper with MS inscription reading 'The Medical Research Committee / 25th April 1917'. Letter confirming that the book is no longer property of the library loosely inserted. In 1757 Home's Principles of Agriculture and Vegetation was published in Edinburgh by Hamilton and Balfour. In 1758 Hamilton, Balfour and Neill published Home's major work, Principia Medicinae, a scientific history of disease. Principia Medicinae greatly enhanced Home's reputation, particularly in Europe and America where it found a large audience for whom it served as a textbook. Running into several editions, it was still in use well into the nineteenth century. After such success Hamilton wanted to produce a second edition of Princliples of Agriculture and Vegetation but Home rather craftily wrote to Millar instead, asking what he would be prepared to offer in order to publish it himself. Millar successfully won the right to produce the second edition and at the same time paid Home for Medical Facts and Experiments, which appeared in 1759. ESTC T120708   Ref: 51841 
£200
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[Hoogstraten, Jan van:] Afzetzel van de Republyk of Vrye Staat van Venetie, Begrepen in drie Boeken, door J.V.H. Amsteldam [Amsterdam]: Hendrik vande Gaete, en Johannes van Leeuwen, 1715. 4to., pp. [l], 152 + engraved frontispiece. Light toning and spotting. Modern marbled boards, leather label with gilt lettering to spine. The first edition of this poem in praise of the Venetian republic by Jan van Hoogstraten (1662-1756). It is rare in the UK, with COPAC locating only the BL copy.   Ref: 42703 
£250
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[Houlston:] Houlston's Series of Tracts, Numbers 9, 11, 16-20, 30-34, 41-44, 51-54, 61-62, 69, 71, 73, followed by Religious Society Tracts, Numbers 339, 457, 632, 637-638, 641, 739, 757. London: Houlston and Co.; the Religious Tract Society, (c.1830-60.) 12mo., 36 tracts bound together. Vignette title pages. Occasional foxing, some leaves a little browned. Bound in half green calf with marbled paper boards, gilt title to spine. Joints and edges very rubbed, f.f.e.p. removed. Pencil inscription to Elsie Bonney from Grandma, May 23rd 1904 to front paste-down. Includes the titles The Bitter Sweet, parts 1 &2 by Mrs Sherwood, The Two Wives, parts 1& 2 by Mrs Cameron, Where Are You Going? and A Conversation on the Truth of the Bible, Between Two Workmen.   Ref: 46288 
£360
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Howard, John: Aikin, John (ed.): An Account of the Principal Lazarettos in Europe; with Various Papers Relative to the Plague: Together with Further Observations on Some Foreign Prisons and Hospitals; and Additional Remarks on the Present State of Those in Great Britain and Ireland; [bound with] Appendix, Containing Observations Co Warrington: printed by William Eyres; and sold by T. Cadell, J. Johnson, C. Dilly, and J.Taylor, in 1789; 1791. First edition. 4to., pp. viii, 259, [xv]; [ii], 32 + 23 engraved plates (many of which folding), including a very large table. With half-title and leaf of instructions to binder bound in. Odd spots of foxing and the occasional light ink smudge, sporadic light toning; several plates with closed tears near attachments, 3 of which significant, plate edges often lightly crumpled, occasional foxing, faint dampstain to fore-edge margin of final 2 plates. Contemporary marbled calf recently rebacked plainly but competently, green morocco gilt spine label, edges coloured yellow, marbled endpapers, cloth-reinforced hinges. Joints a little creased, edges rubbed and corners wearing but a sound, handsome copy. Armorial bookplate of The Right Hon. Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire to front paste-down. Oddly, this book was written by one John Howard and owned by another, completely unrelated, one: General John Howard, 15th Earl of Suffolk & 8th Earl of Berkshire (1739-1820) was a British soldier and nobleman. The price of 'Twelve Shillings unbound' is printed below the imprint (omitted in some copies). Howard (1726?1790) spent 15 months from 1785, travelling throughout western and southern Europe inspecting lazarettos (quarantine stations) for the treatment of plague victims. Here we find the result of his work, An Account of the Principal Lazarettos in Europe, published at Warrington in 1789. In it he surveys conditions in lazarettos, prisons and hospitals, going into great detail and making observations and suggestions for their improvement. He organises his findings by first by country, and then by county when he gets to Ireland, Scotland and England. Writing near the end of his life, he also reflects on his own efforts at reform. Of the Gaol at Southwark he writes that prisoners awaiting transportation to Australia 'lay almost perishing in the gaol': 'I am persuaded this would have been in great measure prevented, if penitentiary houses had been built on the salutory spot at Islington fixed on by Dr. Fothergill and myself: the gentlemen whose continual opposition defeated the design, and adopted the expensive, dangerous and destructive scheme of transportation to Botany Bay, I leave to their own reflections upon their conduct.' (p.147). Howard set off again on his travels a few years later but died of fever at Kherson in southern Russia on 20th January 1790. The results of his final travels are found in the added Appendix here. 'His death was announced in the London Gazette (1790, 174), a unique honour for a civilian, and his statue, the first to be admitted to the cathedral, was erected by public subscription in St Paul's.' (ODNB) ESTC T115289   Ref: 51654  show full image..
£650
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