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[Claudian] Claudianus, Claudius: (Burman, Pieter II; Heinsius, Niklaas, eds.:) Opera, quae exstant, omnia ad membranarum veterum fidem castigata [...] Amstelaedami [Amsterdam], ex officina Schouteniana, 1760. First edition thus. 4to, pp. [xiv], xxxii, [ii], 31, [v], 600, (without loss) 609-1112 (mispaginated as usual). Large paper copy, with some leaves deckled at bottom edge. Title in red and black with woodcut device, woodcut head- and tail-pieces and initials. Occasional very light foxing, some leaves with a faint line of toning across head margin and a few others unopened at head, short closed tear (seemingly the result of a paper flaw) to leaf 5R2 affecting text but not legibility. Late 18th- or early 19th-century crimson straight-grain morocco, gilt title to spine, a.e.g., ornate dentelles, green leather joints, marbled endpapers, pale blue ribbon bookmark bound in. Spine a little faded and rubbed, a few light marks, endcaps and bottom edges beginning to wear, a very good copy handsomely bound. Small gilt oval crest of Archibald Acheson, 3rd Earl of Gosford (1806-1864) to front paste-down. Round Jesuit Society inkstamp (Milltown Park, Dublin) to title-page. First edition of Pieter Burman's (1714-1778) edition of Claudian, with commentary by his uncle, Pieter Burman I, and previously unprinted notes by the neo-latin poet and classical verse scholar Niklaas Heinsius (1620-1681). Claudian of Alexandria (b. c. AD 360) was court poet under the emperor Honorius and his minister Stilicho. "In diction and technique he is the equal of Lucan and Statius, in hyperbole he perhaps outdoes them" (OCD). His poetry is also a valuable historical source. Dibdin writes that this is 'unquestionably a very superior edition, and it contains a greater fund of critical illustration than the preceding by Gesner.' Dibdin I (4th edn.) 472   Ref: 51703 
£600
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Cowley, Abraham: The Works of Mr. Abraham Cowley. In two volumes... The eleventh edition. [With:] Volume the Second. [And:] The third and Last Volume... The ninth edition. London: Printed for J. Tonson; Charles Harper, 1710; 1711. 3 vols., 8vo., pp. [iv], LXXVIII, [viii], 392 + engraved portrait frontispiece and 17 engraved plates (of which 13 are portraits); [ii], [393]-894, [ii] + engraved frontispiece and 9 engraved plates (of which 6 are portraits); [xxii], 495, [ix] + engraved frontispiece and another 4 engraved plates. Lightly browned, a little minor spotting. Contemporary calf, plain spines with red morocco labels, boards bordered in blind, edges sprinkled red, rubbed at extremities, neatly conserved by Chris Weston replacing original labels, f.f.e.p. removed from first vol. Early ink ownership inscription "Anne Pitt" on front flyleaf of vols. 2 & 3; large amorial bookplate of "John Borthwick / CROOKSTON" on versos of title-pages. The first volume contains the major poems and several essays, while the second volume reprints Cowley's juvenilia and university plays. ESTC T133366; T133364.   Ref: 36434 
£225
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Crucius, Jacobus: Epistolarum Libri IV. Cum Duplici Indice. Delphis [Delft]: ex officina Johannes Andreae Kloeting, 1633. First edition. 8vo., pp.[xvi], 606, [xxvi]. Woodcut initials. F.f.e.p. and following blank both with top fore-edge corner excised, title page a bit grubby, some light foxing to blanks front and rear. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, yapp edges. Vellum darkened, quite heavily marked especially to spine but entirely sound. Inscription to f.f.e.p. reading, 'Antonius [surname obscured], Coll. Reg. Oxon. ex dono Guliolmi Preston, 1743'. Crucius also published under the name Mercurius Batavus. This collection of letters was intended as instructional literature, imitating Ciceronian style and delivering moral and religious ideals alongside regular communication. To that end, many of the letters given earlier dates were actually written later to be included in the book, rather than sent.   Ref: 49124 
£200
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(De Bussières, Jean:) Flosculi Historici Delibati Nunc Delibatiores Redditi, Sive Historia Universalis [...] Coloniae Agrippinae [Cologne]: apud Andream Bingium, 1661. 2 works bound as 1. 12mo., pp. [iv], 339, [i]; 68 + 12 leaves of plates, each with 6 portraits. Divisional title-page (i.e. ²A1) has 19mm excised at tail edge, seemingly to remove the imprint and date. Light dampstain to lower fore-edge corner of first few leaves, occasional light spots and smudges but generally clean. Contemporary brown calf, a little blind tooling to spine and borders. Rubbed, endcaps and joints worn, corners fraying with some loss to upper fore-edge corner. Much earlier binder's waste (misprinted fragments of a work of the medieval philosopher-theologian Duns Scotus (c.1266-1308)) has been used for the endpapers, which are not pasted to the boards. A very good, unsophisticated copy. Initials M.O. in an old hand to engraved title-page. The engraved title-page reads Universalis Historia ab orbe condito usq[ue] ad annum 1657, and is dated 1660. The last 68 pages, 'Chronologia principum sive series & successio Romanorum pontificum' have a separate title page on leaf ²A1, and separate pagination and signatures. No author given, but Jean de Bussières (1607-1678) is mentioned in other editions.   Ref: 51825  show full image..
£175
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De Commines, Philip: (Danett, Thomas, trans.:) The History of Philip de Commines, Knight, Lord of Argenton. London: printed for Samuel Mearne, John Martyn, and Henry Herringman [...] 1674. 4th edition, 'corrected, with annotations'. Folio, pp. [xvi], 348. Woodcut device to title-page, and woodcut initials. Occasional light marginal dampstaining, some smudgy marks particularly to title-page, marks and staining to rear endpapers, a few short closed marginal tears, closed tear to to I6 affecting 3 words but with no loss, tiny scorch-hole to K6 only affecting a couple of letters. Contemporary brown sheep, almost complete surface loss (now resembles suede) with just a little surface remaining in patches, endcaps lost, joints split at head and tail but cords holding firm, corners very worn, ffep excised, rfep with lower corner torn away. Internally good, but in an extremely worn binding that would certainly benefit from some attention. To front paste-down: 'Date 1674' in purple pencil, quite large MS to centre of board; 'P.F.' in an old hand to top corner; a few pencilled bookseller's codes. To title-page: 'W(?) Wombwell Booke' and 'D. Cooke', in different old hands. To p.303, note of an illegible name 'Madam (?). To rfep verso: 'W. Wombwell His Booke 1679'; three lines of old MS smudged away. P.287 is misnumbered 285 and p.224 is misnumbered 124, as usual. The work is divided into eight books, with many marginal glosses. This translation was originally made whilst Danett (1543–1601?) was still a student: the translator's dedication (signed 'Thomas Danett' and dated 1 Nov. 1596) states that it is 'thirty years since' he first presented this History 'rudely translated into our vulgar tongue' from the French original, and that he subsequently revised and enlarged his translation by the advice of Sir Christopher Hatton. 'Danett's epistle to the reader 'suggests that he saw history primarily in exemplary terms, and those who profit from it as making 'the historie to be a paterne of all their doings, both private and publique, & studie not onelie to have the speculation of histories, but also the practise'. Danett eventually published his translation in an expanded version in 1596, with a dedication to Burghley. He explains in the preface that Sir Christopher Hatton had read it in manuscript and commended it, while other gentlemen had read it after Hatton's death in 1591, and urged him to publish it. Danett had responded that the secrets of princes should not be published in the vulgar language, but the 'gentlemen' threatened to publish it themselves, and so Danett had proceeded into print for fear that an unauthorized publication would mar his work. He provided his text with sometimes elaborate notes on such matters as his choice of words in translation, English values for French money, and the differences between Commines and English chronicles, and even ventured to disagree with Commines over the latter's belief that the world was going to the dogs [...] Danett's translation of Commines was his most popular work, with further editions in 1601, 1614, 1665, and 1674. It was reissued in the Tudor Translations series in 1897, edited by Charles Whibley, who praised Danett's prose style, noting that he often supplied lively metaphors for which there was no equivalent in Commines's rather plain prose. He also asserted that even in the translation there was evidence for Danett's historical expertise, since he 'rigorously' corrected his original as well as adding notes.' (ODNB) Philippe de Commines (or de Commynes / de Comines) (1447-1511), writer and diplomat in the courts of Burgundy and France, has been called called 'the first critical and philosophical historian since classical times' (Oxford Companion to English Literature). Not exactly a historian in the conventional sense, his analyses of the political world in which he lived make his writings a virtually unique resource. ESTC R1689; Wing C5542   Ref: 50563 
£175
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De Guichard, Martin: Noctes Granzovianae, seu discursus panegyricus de Antiquis Triumphis, in publicum tam ecclesiarum quam politiarum usum [...] Amstelodami [Amsterdam], Apud Aegidium Janssonium Valckenier 1661. First edition. 12mo., pp. [xlviii], 552. Engraved title-page, 10 illustrations in text (6 of crowns, 3 from ancient coins, 1 of a sphere). Latin, occasional Greek and Hebrew letter. Light foxing and browning. Bontemporary calf, spine gilt, red morocco gilt label, a.e.g, spine and corners recently repaired in a sympathetic manner, marbled endpapers probably from the turn of the twentieth century. An attractive copy. Bookplate of Henri Lambert, avocat, Versailles, stamped 8 May 1906. Illustrated study of ancient triumphs and spectacles.   Ref: 51821 
£200
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De Vertot, [René-Aubert] L'Abbé: The History of the Revolutions of Portugal. Translated from the French. Glasgow: printed for Robert Urie, 1760. 12mo., pp. [viii], iii-viii, 9-152, [x].Contemporary tan sheep, raised bands, small gilt title label to spine. Joints worn with lower just beginning to crack, edges worn, top corner of upper board fraying, a little toning to endpaper edges, very good. De Vertot (1655-1735) originally wrote his Histoire de la conjuration de Portugal in 1690, at the suggestion of Fontenelle and the Abbé de Saint-Pierre. The printer and bookseller Robert Urie 'printed regularly until 1757, in which year the first books bearing the imprint 'Printed for Robert Urie' were issued from what was clearly his press. After 1759 he printed only occasionally. It is probable that he devoted himself to bookselling and publishing, and left the printing to William Smith [...] who worked with Urie and, at his death, succeeded him [...]. The 1750s, and even more the 1760s, revealed an interest in the books of the French Enlightenment, particularly translations of the works of Voltaire: Urie published more than twenty of these, many within a year of their first translation into English.' (ODNB) ESTC T76269   Ref: 51413 
£200
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[Debreuil, Jean; Chambers, E., trans.:] Practical Perspective; or An Easy Method of Representing Natural Objects […] London: printed for the proprietors Bowles and Carver at their map and print warehouse, [n.d. c.1795.] Seventh edition. 4to., pp. xxx, [I], 150, [I] + 150 plates on 81 leaves. Some light toning to plates with transfer to adjacent pages, title-page a little foxed. Contemporary tan sheep boards, recently rebacked in well-matched morocco, red gilt label to spine, all edges yellow, endpapers renewed. Some scrapes including one repaired to centre of upper board, edges chipped but still a good, sound copy. First published in French as parts 1-5 of La Perspective Pratique (1642-9).   Ref: 50439  show full image..
£350
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Dictys Cretensis: [Dares Phrygius:] [Joseph of Exeter:] (Smids, L., ed.:) De Bello et Excidio Trojanae, in usum Serenissimi Delphini [...] accedunt in hac nova editione notae variorum integrae; nec non Josephus Iscanus, cum notis Sam. Dresemii. Numismatibus & Gemmis, Historiam illustrantibus exornavit Lud. Smids, M.D. Dissertationem de Dictye Cretensi Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Apud Georgium Gallet, 1702. 8vo., pp. [lxxxiv], 177, [lxxv], 54, [22], 168, [viii], including 1 engraved frontispiece as part of the first gathering + 1 additional engraved frontispiece and 6 further plates. Includes final errata leaf. Title page in red and black, engraved head-pieces, woodcut decorations. Occasional light spotting, a few faint smudgy marks. Contemporary vellum, raised bands, title inked to spine, blind-tooled border, frame and centrepiece to each board, edges sprinkled blue and red. A little grubby, a few small marks to boards (possibly wax?), free endpapers very lightly toned at edges, very good overall. Small MS inscription of William R. Lyall to head of title-page. William Rowe Lyall (1788–1857) was Dean of Canterbury from 1845 until his death. He was the younger brother of Gerorge Lyall (1778/9–1853), MP for the City of London and chairman of the East India Company. The Delphin edition of three Latin poems on the Trojan war, by the pseudonymous authors 'Dictys of Crete' (4th-cent.) and 'Dares of Phrygia' (5th/6th-cent.), and by the English monk and crusader Joseph of Exeter (d.1224), they are evidence for the continuity of the Homeric legends through the Latin Middle Ages. Basing his edition of Dictys and Dares on Anne Dacier's Delphin edition of 1680, with notes also from an edition of Strassburg, 1691, the editor Ludolf Smids has added numismatic illustrations and his own commentary, and an essay by Jacobus Perizonius (1651-1715). The text and commentary for Joseph of Exeter are from an edition of Frankfurt, 1623 (cf. Schweiger). Schweiger II 332.   Ref: 51906 
£325
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Drexel, Jeremias: Recta intentio omnium humanarum actionum amussis. [bound with:] Gymnasium Patientiae. Col. Agrippinae [Cologne]: Apud Corn. ab Egmund, 1634. 16mo., pp. [xiv] 416 [ii]; [xiv] 387 [iii] + engraved title pages in each book. Two further full-page engravings in the text of each book. The edge of first three leaves a bit creased. Contemporary vellum boards, long sides overlapping, spine lettered in ink, ties removed, somewhat soiled, pastedowns torn. Ownership inscription of Jacobus van Aker D'heysbroeck to f.f.e.p. recto and A. Domis (1802) to verso. Two works by the Jesuit writer Jeremias Drexel (or Drexelius, 1581-1638). The first has been called a prelude to his most famous work, the 'Heliotropum', while the second, the 'Gymnasium of Patience', comprises arguments for Christian acceptance of suffering. The imprint is usually considered to be false, with the books printed by Blaeu in Amsterdam. VD17 32:709942B; VD17 1:075296S.   Ref: 29953 
£350
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