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Howell, James: Lustra Ludovici, or the Life of the late Victorious King of France, Lewis the XIII. (And of his Cardinall de Richelieu). Divided into Seven Lustres. London: printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1646. First edition. Small folio (278 x 182mm), pp. [xii], 188, [viii] (with usual mispaginations), including to leaf *2 recto an engraved portrait of Charles II as a boy, signed G.G.. Some woodcut initials and decorations. Short annotations in an old hand to p.131 and p.144, plus a few underlinings in the same ink. Title-page a little dusty, occasional light ink smudges, short closed tear to bottom margin leaf V3. Contemporary deep red morocco, spine heavily gilt with raised bands, gilt borders and frames with corner tools to each board, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. A few small marks and scuffs, small repaired scrape to upper board, bottom fore-edge corner of upper board bumped. A very handsome copy. To the third compartment of the spine, a complex monogram surmounted by a baron's coronet. To the front paste-down, an armorial bookplate of the North Library of the Earl of Macclesfield, dated 1860. To the ffep verso a short note in an old hand: 'Sept. 5. 1720. Collat. & perfect (?) J. Wright.' 'Anne' has been added to the title-page, again in an old hand, but the surname has been erased leaving a small hole. A small blind-embossed Macclesfield coat of arms has been added to the title-page and subsequent four pages, plus a few other leaves elsewhere. Howell was imprisoned in the Fleet in 1643 and remained there for the next eight years. This incarceration 'forced Howell into an intense period of writing, for both financial and political reasons [...] Almost immediately after his imprisonment Howell was forced into a defence of parliamentary privilege in order to deflect William Prynne's charge that he was 'no friend to Parliaments, but a malignant'. Prynne based his objections on a few mildly anti-parliamentary remarks Howell had made in Dodona's Grove in 1640. In 1644 Howell issued from the Fleet a series of tracts intended to present a carefully worded, moderate position and at the same time to urge a general return to reason.' (ODNB) ESTC R4873; Wing H3092   Ref: 51871 
£800
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Hughes, H. Stuart: Consciousness and Society: The Reorientation of European Social Thought 1890-1930. Brighton: Harvester Press, 1979. 8vo., pp. xi, [i], 433, [i], [xv], [i]. Dark grey cloth, silver title to spine. Headcap a little creased, very good. Reprint. First published in the UK in 1959 by MacGibbon & Kee.   Ref: 51503 
£20
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Jackson, Catherine Charlotte, Lady: The Last of The Valois and Accession of Henry of Navarre 1559 - 1589. In Two Volumes. London: Richard Bentley and Son, 1888. 2 vols., pp. x, 405; xi, 427, light foxing to beginning and end. Original blue cloth gilt, extremities worn. Armorial bookplate covered by blank sticker.   Ref: 30202  show full image..
£60
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Johnston, Kenneth R. Johnston: The Hidden Wordsworth: Poet, Lover, Rebel, Spy. New York & London: W.W. Norton & Co., 1998. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxii, [ii], 965, [i] + plates. Green and beige paper-covered boards, gilt title to spine. Top edge a little foxed, slight creasing to headcap but still a very good copy. Author inscribed to title-page. Contemporary review clipping loosely inserted.   Ref: 51640 
£20
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Kennedy, George A.: Classical Rhetoric and Its Christian and Secular Tradition From Ancient to Modern Times. London: Croom Helm, 1980. First edition. 8vo., pp. xii, 291. Red cloth, gilt title to spine, edges lightly dusted, very good. Dust-jacket, spine sunned and toning to top edge of back cover, shelf wear, but still very good.   Ref: 51899 
£20
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Lampson, Miles (Lord Killearn); (Evans, Trefor, ed.:) The Killearn Diaries, 1934-1946. London: Sidgwick and Jackson, 1972. First edition. 8vo., pp.xvi, 400. Black cloth, gilt title to spine. End-caps a little creased, top edge dusted. Dust-jacket spine sunned, edges a little creased but still very good. Gift inscription, to Tommy and Elizabeth with love from Jacquie, Feb. 1973, 35 Montpelier Sq. SW7. This is likely the wife (Jacqueline) or the daughter (Jacquetta Elliot) of Lord Killearn. Lord Killearn (1880-1964) was High Commissioner and Ambassador to Egypt 1936-46.   Ref: 47028 
£95
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Lucas, Richard: Enquiry after Happiness. In Three Parts. [Parts I-II:] The Sixth Edition. [Part III:] The Fifth Edition. London: Printed for R. Gosling [etc.]; Printed for W. Innys and R. Manby, 1734-35. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. xx, 240, [viii], 184; [viii], viii, 456. Contemporary sprinkled calf, spines divided by gilt rules, red morocco labels, boards bordered with a gilt rule, a touch rubbed at extremities, a few corners lightly worn. Contemporary ink ownership inscription "Thomas Price 1740" at head of title-page of both vols. The three parts were first published in 1685, 'the first showing the possibility of obtaining happiness, the second the true notion of life, and the third treating religious perfection' (ODNB). ESTC T83521; T83524.   Ref: 36244 
£350
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Mandeville, Bernard, (Kaye, F.B. ed.:) The Fable of the Bees, or Private Vices, Publick Benefits. Volumes II & II. Oxford University Press with Sandpiper Books, 2001. New edition. Two vols., 8vo.. Black cloth, orange and white dust-jackets. Still in publisher's shrink-wrap, fine. An Oxford University Press Academic Monograph Reprint. This edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.   Ref: 51625 
£30
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Mandeville, John: The Voiage and Travaile of Sir John Maundevile, Kt.. Which treateth of the Way to Hierusalem; and of Marvayles of Inde, with other Ilands and Countryes. Now publish'd entire from an Original MS. in the Cotton Library. London: printed for Woodman and Lyon in Russel-Street Covent-Garden, and C. Davis, in Hatton-Garden, 1727. 8vo., pp. xvi, 384, [xvi]. Contents bound at rear with Index, rather than as usual after the Editor's Preface. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head- & tail-pieces and initials. Occasional foxing, a few ink spots and smudges, first and final leaves a little dusty. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked with older red morocco gilt spine label retained, board edges and corners repaired, endpapers replaced with armorial bookplate slightly visible beneath front paste-down. A little rubbed but a very good, soundly repaired copy. Ownership inscription of Wm. Leaker of Liverpool at head of Editor's Preface (A2). First appearing in France c.1357 as Voyages de Jehan de Mandeville Chevalier, the name of this work's true author remains unknown. It tells the story of the narrator's supposed world travels and was enormously popular: there were further French versions, as well as translations into German, English, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Irish, Danish, and Czech. 'Altogether over 250 manuscripts survive in twenty-two versions. In England alone there were four Latin and four English translations and a rhymed version.' (ODNB) 'Sir John Mandeville' claims to be an English knight, born in St Albans, who departed on his travels in 1322. However, there is no historical evidence for his adventures, and it appears that at least 90% of the narrative of the Voyages can be traced back to preexisting written sources. So who was the real author? Examination of the original French text is revealing. M.C. Seymour posits 'that the author had no knowledge of St Albans but was a fluent French-speaker; that he composed his work c.1357 in a large, almost certainly ecclesiastical, library; that he was an ecclesiastic, with a cleric's knowledge of the Bible, and probably a member of a regular order; that he was a fluent reader of Latin but lacked any knowledge of Greek or Arabic; that he was an informed and intelligent reader of books describing the Holy Land and other foreign parts; that he had mastered the theories of Sacrobosco and his commentators, possibly at the University of Paris, on the rotundity of the world and was aware of the possibility of circumnavigation; that he had never travelled to the lands he describes; that he was aware of current French accounts of foreign lands and was in a position to launch his own work into the mainstream of the Parisian book-trade.' (ODNB) This anaylsis presents Jean le Long (d.1388) as a likely candidate. As librarian of the Benedictine abbey church of St Bertin at St Omer (in France but then under English rule and on the main route between Calais and Paris) he would have had access to genuine travellers and pilgrims visiting the Mediterranean and the Near East who would have used the route and stayed at the abbey. '[The abbey's] library contained all the works used by Mandeville in the compilation of the Voyages, including the comparatively scarce French translation of the Directorium ad faciendum passagium transmarinum made by the hospitaller Jean de Vignay (c.1340).' (ODNB) ESTC T100821   Ref: 51726 
£650
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Mayr, Georgius: Institutiones Linguae Hebraicae in sex partes distributae. Lugduni [Lyon]: Sumptibus Antonii Iullieron. 1649. 8vo., pp. [viii] 463 [i]. Printed in Hebrew and Roman characters. Some browning and spotting. Contemporary calf, spine in six compartments with raised bands, rebacked preserving original gilt-decorated compartments and red morocco label, now somewhat darkened, boards flaked but since polished, corners renewed. Old ownership inscription to title of 'J. Thompson'(?). The major work of the Jesuit linguist Georg Mayr, a successful grammar of the Hebrew language for use by Christian hebraists. It followed the popular grammar of the same title by Robert Bellarmine (1578 et seq.), Mayr's teacher, and Mayr explains that Jesuit duties had prevented Bellarmine from achieving what he might have. Clearly there was a demand for new and improved Hebrew grammars, since Mayr's work, first published in 1616, was reprinted in 1622 and again in this edition of 1649.   Ref: 28113  show full image..
£375
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