Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Banks, Iain M.: Look to Windward. London: Orbit, 2000. First edition. 8vo., pp. [x], 357, [i]. Internally clean. Black cloth, bronze title to spine. Vague creasing to tailcap, very good overall. Dust-jacket very slightly creased and top edge with a few faint dusty marks to verso (not outwardly visible). Sixth of the Culture novels.   Ref: 51479 
£20
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Banks, Iain: The Bridge. London: Macmillan, 1986. First edition, signed by the author. 8vo., pp. [x], 259, [i]. Very slightly toned towards page edges. Blue cloth, gilt title to spine, very vague crease to headcap but very good overall. Dust-jacket fractionally creased at edges, very good indeed. Autographed to title-page. When interviewed by SFX Magazine in 1994 The Bridge was Banks’ favourite of his novels, as well the one he thought to be technically the best. "Definitely the intellectual of the family, it's the one that went away to University and got a first. I think The Bridge is the best of my books."(‘The Books of Iain Banks - and Iain M. Banks’)   Ref: 51373 
£175
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Barker, Pat: Life Class. London: Hamish Hamilton, 2007. First edition. 8vo., pp. [vi], 248, [ii]. Brown cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Near fine. A little shelf-wear to dust-jacket, tail of spine a little rubbed but still very good.   Ref: 50457 
£25
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Barnish, Sam J. & Marazzi, Federico, eds.: The Ostrogoths, from the Migration Period to the Sixth Century: an Ethnographic Perspective. Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007. 4to., pp.[vi], 497, [i]. Black cloth, red title to spine, almost fine. Dust-jacket very lightly shelf worn, almost fine. A stand-alone work, also Volume 7 in the Studies in Historical Archaeoethnology series.   Ref: 51599 
£45
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(Barnwell Abbey) (The History of Barnwell Abbey, near Cambridge, with the Origin of Sturbright Fair, taken from Ancient Manuscripts; to which is added a List of the Mayors of Cambridge, from the year 1488 to 1806, &tc &tc.) (Cambridge: printed by Mary Watson:) Not before 1863. 4to., near-contemporary manuscript copy, mostly in the same neat hand and with three hand-drawn illustrations. Edges darkened a little, occasional ink smudges and light spots of foxing. Recent half burgundy morocco with matching cloth-covered boards, green gilt title label to spine. Occasional scuffs but still very good. Address details embossed to ffep of Cayton Hall, South Stainley suggesting that the book may once have belonged to Nigel and Mary Hudleston. The Hudlestons assembled a uniquely important collection of Yorkshire folk songs, which is now archived at National Centre for English Cultural Tradition at Sheffield University. The text of the original printed work was taken largely from ‘The History and Antiquities of Barnwell Abbey’, found in volume V of John Nichols' Bibliotheca Topographica Britannica. Here it has been painstakingly copied by hand, the list of Mayors of Cambridge has been updated and several leaves of futher miscellanous notes have been added at the rear. The list of Mayors found in this volume continues past the 1806 publication date to 1821 in the same hand, and from there in a different hand to 1841 (though space has been left for the list to continue up to 1846). The following five pages contain notes on the text, dated up to 1835. These seem to be in the same hand as the main text, although perhaps not always quite as carefully inscribed. Three pages in a different hand follow, the first of which is titled ‘The Defence of G.J. Holyoake in his Trial at Gloucester’. This refers to Gerorge Jacob Holyoake (1817-1906), freethinker and co-operator who was, in 1842, the last person in England to be tried for blasphemy at a public lecture. The text here appears to be the beginning of an address to the court, the handwriting becoming increasingly illegible as it continues down the page. The following page bears the title ‘Verses Written by Francis Price on the Revolt of Islam Canton 1863’, which seemingly refers to the Dungan Revolt which began 1862 in western China. On the next and final page the writer (of these last few pages, rather than the bulk of the text) provides some information about his identity. He is Francis Augustus John Price, born in Cowbridge, South Wales on 9th July 1844. He names his mother, though the writing here is unfortuately illegible, and gives her date of birth as December 24th 1819. His father was Charles Price, born in Worcester on August 20th 1819. He then writes a little of his siblings and grandmother, the handwriting once again becoming increasingly illegible as it continues down the page.   Ref: 51414 
£350
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Barraclough, Geoffrey (trans. & intro.): Mediaeval Germany, 911-1250. Essays by German Historians. Vol. I, Introduction; Vol. II, Essays. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1948. Second impressions. 2 vols. 8vo., pp. xii, 141; x, 305. Cloth, gilt-lettered, spines cocked, edges dusted, very good. Dust-jacket, 2.4cm tear with a bit of loss to bottom edge of lower wrapper of vol. I, 1.3cm tear with loss to top edge of upper wrapper of vol. II, endcaps fraying, spines browned, shelf worn, price clipped, good. Library numbers to spines, library stamps and stickers front endpapers and title pages. Studies in Mediaeval History.   Ref: 49382 
£14
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Barwick, Peter: The Life of the Reverend Dr. John Barwick, D.D. London: Printed by J. Bettenham. 1724. Large paper copy. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 552, [xl] + 2 engr. portrait frontispieces. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, spine gilt in compartments, orange morocco label,extremities rubbed, spine darkened, joints split but boards still attached, endcaps worn. "James Affleck" book label on front pastedown, contemporary ink inscr. on f.f.e.p. "Eliz. Dolben" and above "Jam:s. Affleck [undeciphered] e dono"; also, mid-20th C. provenance note by Peter B. G. Binnall on verso of marbled flyleaf. The first English edition of this biography and indication of support for the Anglican church and the king, originally written in Latin by the subject's brother. John Barwick (1612-1664) and his brother Peter were both staunch royalists, rewarded with significant posts following the Restoration - Peter as medical advisor to the king and John as dean of St Paul's. ESTC T73568.   Ref: 36006 
£200
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Bateman, Thomas: Ten Years’ Diggings in Celtic & Saxon Grave Hills in the Counties of Derby, Stafford, and York, from 1848 to 1858; with Notices of Some Former Discoveries Hitherto Unpublished, and Remarks on the Crania and Pottery from the Mounds. London: George Allen & Sons, n.d. [1861]. 8vo.,pp.xiv, [iii], 18-309, [i]. Illustrations in the text. Very occasional light foxing, a few faint creases. Green cloth, gilt title to spine. A little rubbed, endcaps creased, slightly shaken with endpaper split at rear hinge, but textblock holding firm, endpapers lightly toned. A good working copy. Ownership inscription of Arthur Cornish to front pastedown. According to Arthur C. Clarke, Cornish was “an archaeologist and a very nice guy who definitely influenced my scientific interest. He gave me quite a lot of stuff, including fossils and a mammoth’s tooth.” (Neil McAleer: Sir Arthur C. Clarke: Odyssey of a Visionary.) ‘Highly regarded in his lifetime, Bateman's (1821-1861) reputation rests largely on his publications relating to barrow-digging. Himself a follower of such pioneers as Richard Colt Hoare and William Cunnington, Bateman influenced later archaeologists such as William Boyd Dawkins and J. Wilfrid Jackson in Derbyshire. Disillusioned with Stephen Glover, who handled the subscriptions for his first book, Vestiges of the Antiquities of Derbyshire (1847), he financed all his later publications himself. As well as many articles in learned journals such as the Archaeological Journal, the Journal of the British Archaeological Association, and The Reliquary, edited by Llewellynn Jewitt, Bateman produced [his last book] Ten Years' Digging in Celtic and Saxon Gravehills in 1861.’ (ODNB) A controversial figure, Bateman’s methods and the speed at which he worked would likely horrify modern archaeologists though his extensive note-taking earned him a high reputation among his contemporaries.   Ref: 50492 
£125
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[Bateman] Howarth, E. (prep.): Catalogue of the Bateman Collection of Antiquities in the Sheffield Public Museum. London: Dulau and Co., ‘Published by order of the committee’, 1899. 8vo., pp. xxiii, [i], 254, [i] + illustrated frontispiece. Many illustrations in the text. Brown cloth, gilt title to spine. Endcaps a little creased, some light dusty marks, ffep excised. A very good copy. Tiny label of J. Robertshaw, Binder, Sheffield to front paste-down (also printed by J. Robertshaw). After Thomas Bateman’s death in 1861 death his son sold most of the Bateman collection, parts of which (including the famous Benty Grange Anglo-Saxon helmet) were acquired by the Sheffield City Museum in 1893. The museum (now called the Weston Park Museum) still houses the collection, where it forms the core of their archaeology holdings.   Ref: 50493 
£25
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Bateson, Mary (ed.): Records of the Borough of Leicester Being a Series of Extracts from the Archives of the Corporation of Leicester, 1103-1327 [and] 1327-1509. London: C. J. Clay and Sons, 1899. 2 vols. 8vo., pp. lxviii, 448; lxxxii, 523. Blue cloth gilt, fabric tearing along upper joint of vol 2 but binding sound, some edgewear and ends of spine chipped slightly. Bookseller’s tickets, bookplate, library plate and press cuttings pasted onto beginnings. The first two volumes, covering the Medieval period.   Ref: 35015 
£80
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