Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Dugdale, William: The Baronage of England, or An Historical Account of the Lives and Most Memorable Actions of Our English Nobility [...] London: Printed by Tho. Newcomb, for Abel Roper, John Martin, and Henry Herringman, 1675-6. First edition. 3 vols. in 2, folio. pp. [xii], 476, 497-790, [ii] + 5 folding plates; [viii], 312, 361-488, [iv] (pagination as called for). Title pages in red and black, a few woodcut initials. Each plate is a folding pedigree (Percy, Talbot, Clifford, Berkley and D'Arcie). A few neat marginal notes in both pencil and ink, all in old hands. A few occasional faint spots and smudges but generally bright within, a few small and unobstrusive paper repairs. 19th-century tan (or 'citron') polished calf, rebacked in a slightly lighter shade with raised bands, gilt, brown and tan morocco gilt title labels. Gilt borders and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled endpapers with reinforced cloth hinges. A few tiny scrapes to boards, very good copies overall. Housed in a tan cloth slipcase. Armorial bookplate of Gerald Gascoigne Lynde (1873-1938) to front paste-down of each volume. Directly below, a small label printed with the arms of William Amhurst Tyssen Amherst (18351909), created first Baron Amherst of Hackney in 1892. 'Collecting books and antiquities was Tyssen-Amhurst's chief interest, and he gathered a library rich in ecclesiastical history, especially of the Reformation and the Church of England, and in editions of the English Bible (of which his collection was inferior only to that of Lord Ashburnham). Equally strong was his interest in the history of the spread of printing, and historic bookbindings. He bought steadily from the 1860s, often in friendly rivalry with the earl of Carysfort, and had the benefit in the saleroom of the regular agency of Bernard Quaritch. His library included seventeen Caxtons, in its day one of the two or three best collections in private hands, and his early printed books illustrated the spread of typography in practically every European country. He was a member of the Roxburghe Club [...]. A detailed catalogue of Tyssen-Amherst's collection was in preparation by the distinguished bibliographer Seymour De Ricci, who gratefully recorded that he owed to Tyssen-Amherst's 'kind lessons in English bibliography my own earliest interest in that difficult science'. However, owing to the dishonesty of Charles Cheston, the solicitor entrusted with the administration of Tyssen-Amherst's estate and trust funds, a sale of the library at Didlington proved urgently necessary. De Ricci's catalogue raisonné had to be reduced to a much abbreviated (though still substantial) hand-list, speedily produced for private circulation in 1906. A major sale by Sothebys was organized: its two sections commenced on 3 December 1908 and 24 March 1909, and the total realised was £32,592.' (ODNB) These volumes appear as item 1081 in De Ricci's Hand-List (described as 'very fine') and as Lot 303 in Sotheby's catalogue (a clipping from which is pasted to the ffep verso). Bound by the notable English bookbinder Francis Bedford (17991883), who was patronised by William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland and various other aristocratic book collectors who saw his 'antique' style as befitting the importance of their libraries. Bedford's Atheneum obituary notes the derivative nature of his style, but praises his high level of skill as a binder, restorer and repairer of books. "A history of the aristocracy and its deeds since Anglo-Saxon times, an immense work of genealogical scholarship derived from sound sources that retains its value to the present day [...] Editions of Dugdale's work continued to appear after his death as scholars polished and quarried his researches. His place in the annals of historical scholarship is an honourable one. His speciality was the retrieval of factual information relating to the great institutions of the middle ages: the monasteries, the legal system, and the aristocracy. The scale of his operations was greater than any previous endeavour, and its achievements were astonishing, especially in view of the disorder of the records from which he worked. " (ODNB). ESTC R16723, R225614; Wing D 2480; Brunet II 868; Lowndes 691; Moule CCLXXIV.   Ref: 51874 
£1000
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Dugdale, William: (Wright, James, ed. & trans.:) Monasticon Anglicanum, or, the History of the Ancient Abbies, and other Monasteries, Hospitals, Cathedral and Collegiate Churches in England and Wales. With divers French, Irish and Scotch Monasteries formerly relating to England. London: Printed for Sam. Keble [...] 1693. First edition. 3 vols. in 1. Folio, pp. [xii], 331, [xiii] + 15 plates. Title in red and black, woodcut intitials. Title-page and first plate ('A Benedictine Monk') both trimmed and laid down, leaves A5 & A6 repaired at gutter, light dampstain to lower half of plates, occasional spots and smudges, final gatherings a little toned. Late 18th or early 19th-century tan tree calf, red morocco label and a little gilt to spine, edges lightly sprinkled red. Board edges rubbed, corners wearing, a very good copy overall. Pencilled bookseller's note to front paste-down, monogram inked to ffep. Copious annotations in two old hands: one leaving marginal comments, the other cross referencing. The cross-referencing hand also leaves a bibliographical note to a preliminary blank, numbers the plates, and writes at the head of the final plate, 'These 15 plates are neither numbered nor placed regularly'. The first English epitome of Dugdale's great work; the Monasticon was originally published in three volumes Latin in 1655-73. James Wright (1643-1713) was a barrister at Middle Temple and a significant antiquarian himself, author of an important history of Rutland which he produced with Dugdale's encouragement. He dedicates the work to William Bromley of Warwickshire (1664-1732): "Warwickshire has certainly produced two of the most famous and deserving Writers, in their several ways, that England can boast of; a Dugdale, and a Shakespear, both Williams; a name that has been of eminent Grace to this County in many instances: nor will it ever cease to be so while you are living" (2nd leaf verso). ESTC R8166; Wing D 2487B; Lowndes 685-6.   Ref: 51727 
£600
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Echard, Laurence: The Roman History, From the Restitution of the Empire by Charles the Great, to the Taking of Constantinople by the Turks. Containing the Space of 653 Years. Vol. V and Last. London: printed for R. and J. Bonwicke, J. Tonson, J. Walthoe, R.Wilkin, and T. Ward, 1726. Volume V only. Fifth edition. 8vo., pp. [x], 425, [vii] + additional engraved title-page. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head-piece to first page. Occasional faint spots and smudges but very good within. Slightly later dark brown speckled calf, red gilt morocco label to spine, raised bands with gilt, plain gilt borders, edges sprinkled red. Spine rubbed, a few small tears to head-cap, edges a bit worn, very good. Armorial bookplate of St Andrew, Ld. St John of Bletso to front paste-down. This is likely the 14th Baron St John of Bletso (17591817), but could be his son of the same name (18111874). The fifth volume of Echard's History, which stands alone as a work of medieval history. Echard (bap. 1672, d. 1730) was an enormously prolific writer. His most important work is considered to be his Roman History, 'the first in English, dedicated to the lord keeper of the great seal, Sir John Sommers, which attained ten editions by 1734 and was twice issued in French. The work was designed to be 'particularly useful to young Students and Gentlemen' (preface). There was, as one would expect, a heavy emphasis on moralizing, following the Sallustian model. It is a smooth narrative, without clash of sources, although Echard revealed an interesting preference for Greek sources over Livy, who was declared 'a little too verbose and circumstantial' (ibid.). Echard's political interpretations were conservative: blame the tribunes. He was, in general, an apologist for Roman imperialism, save for the obliteration of Carthage. He was under the spell of Caesar, and then of Octavian-Augustus. Strangely, he used only literary sources, neglecting inscriptions, coins, and archaeological evidence. G. Cornewall Lewis grouped Echard among the 'unenquiring and uncritical' (Enquiry into the Credibility of the Early Roman History, 2 vols., 1855, 1.4). In an age of raging Pyrrhonism, Echard was certainly very conservative. Yet his history held the field in English until Hooke (1738) and Ferguson (1783). A continuation of it was the first imperial inspiration of the young Gibbon [...] Echard's history remained the standard one until replaced by Hume (who does not seem to mention him) and Macaulay (who cites him frequently).' (ODNB) ESTC N26349   Ref: 51718 
£95
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[English Civil War] To the High and Honourable Court of Parliament, the Humble Petition of the University of Oxford, in Behalfe of Episcopacy and Cathedral. (London: s.n.,) 1641. Small 4to., pp. [ii], 6 + several gatherings of binder's blanks. Final leaf dated 'Dat XXIV. Apr. An. Dom. M.DC.XLI.' Neatly repaired closed tears near gutter of each leaf with a little infilling to first and final leaves but not affecting text, title-page slightly grubby, three tiny holes (paper flaws?) to fore-edge margin of last two leaves. Late 19th-century marbled paper-covered boards, gilt morocco label to spine, edges sprinkled red and blue. Paper split at joints with a few small chips but binding firm, edges worn, very good. Small label of James Parker & Co. 27, Broad Street, Oxford to front paste-down. A second pamphlet, An answer to the petition sent from the Universitie of Oxford to the honourable court of Paliament, was published in the same year. ESTC R23315; Wing O986   Ref: 50679 
£300
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Erasmus: Lingua, Sive, De Linguae Usu Atque Abusu Liber Utilissimus; (with) Encomium Moriae, Sive, Declamatio In Laudem Stultitiae; Consultatio De Bello Turcis Inferendo. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: Joannis Maire, 1641; 1641; 1643. 3 bound as 1. 12mo., pp. 410, [xxii]; [viii], 229, [v]; 91, [i]. Third volume without its final blank. Printer's device to each title. Densely annotated in several old hands, occasional spots and smudges but genrally good within. Contemporary vellum, blind-tooled borders, titles inked to spine and both boards (a bit faded), edges red. Spine creased, vellum darkened and marked but still an attractive and interesting copy. Ownership inscriptions of : 'M. Marting [illegible]' dated 1659 to ffep; Charles Best Robinson dated 1852, and Thos. Hodgkin to ffep verso; illegible inscription to top of title-page. The banker and historian Thomas Hodgkin (1831-1913) was author of "Italy and Her Invaders", issued in four volumes in 1870. For the second edition he expanded the work to eight volumes, which were published between 1892 and 1899. STCN 840199635; 840199740; 840231431   Ref: 51266 
£400
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Euripides: (Valckenaer, Lodewijk Caspar, ed.:) Tragoedia Phoenissae. Interpretationem addidit H. Grotii; Graeca castigavit e MStis [...] Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Samuelem et Joannem Luchtmans, 1802. 4to., pp. [iv], xxiii, [i], 452, 196. Stub from excised presentation certificate. Lightly toned towards top edge, foxing from p.125 of the second register onwards corresponding to a slightly lower quality paper stock for the final gatherings. Vellum prize binding, raised bands, gilt spine, borders, frame and central coat-of-arms of Amsterdam, edges sprinkled red and blue. Darkened, a bit grubby, ties lost, endpapers lifting but revealing interesting binding structure beneath. A very good copy overall. Reprinted from Valckenaer's "masterly work on Euripides" (Sandys), first printed by Brouwer at Franeker in 1755. Containing the version of Grotius and including the first printing of parts of the Scholia, "enriched by every thing which can render it most acceptable to a critical student", this reprint has been "improved and enlarged" to be "deserving of strong recommendation" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) I 545. Schweiger I 119. Graesse II 523. Brunet II 1106.   Ref: 50323 
£275
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E[arbery], M[atthias]: Elements of Policy Civil and Ecclesiastical, in a Mathematical Method. London: printed for John Morphew, 1716. 8vo., pp.[iv], 88. Woodcut initials and decorations in the text. Author's name added in both pen and pencil to slightly dusty title-page,internally very good. Disbound, 20th-century (1950's?) paper wrapper glued at spine, handwritten paper label to front cover, edges lightly sprinkled red. One of numerous works by Matthias Earbery the Younger (16901740).'Earbery's views on the rights of hereditary monarchy and episcopacy were those of Charles Leslie, whom he admired, but Earbery had none of Leslie's wit or power of reasoning: his numerous works are largely made up of quantities of historical narrative, related with a strong ideological bias, often laced with personal abuse [...] He was arrested in London in 1723 for seditious libel, and again in 1732 for attacks on Sir Robert Walpole (later first earl of Orford) and King George II in the Royal Oak Journal. His targets ranged from the 'filth of Bangorianism' to John Wyclif, Gilbert Burnet, and Sir John Oldcastle.' (ODNB) ESTC T32602   Ref: 51460 
£95
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Farnaby, Thomas: Index Rhetoricus & Oratorius. [...] Editio novissima prioribus emendatior. Londini [London]: Impensis Philemonis Stephani, 1664. 12mo., pp. 120 [lviii]. Without final blank. A tiny wormhole throughout, becoming a short trail for about 25 leaves, often touching a character but rarely causing loss of legibility. Light dampmark to corner at beginning, a touch of light soiling. Contemporary sheep, blind border to boards, spine divided by blind rules, fore-edge of upper board abraded, some darkening and light rubbing elsewhere, no pastedowns. Early ownership inscriptions to f.f.e.p. (William and Albert Aldersley). The grammarian Thomas Farnaby was one of the most noted schoolteachers in seventeenth-century England. His 'Index Rhetoricus' was popular both at home and on the continent, and was among the first texts used at the nascent Harvard University. This edition (the eighth?) appears to be scarce, with ESTC listing only the BL, the Folger, and Olin Library. Wing F456A. ESTC R230523   Ref: 29957 
£225
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Feith, Everard: Antiquitatum Homericarum Libri IV. Editio accuratior. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: apud Salomonem Schouten, 1726. 8vo., pp.[xx], 404, [xliv]. Woodcut device to title-page, some woodcut initials and decorations. Very faint dampstain to lower margin near front. Final Addenda leaf a little creased. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine (just visible). Quite grubby, endcaps a little creased, some smudgy marks to endpapers but a good, firm copy. To front paste-down, the signature of Charles Mayo. There are several likely Charles Mayos to whom this volume may have belonged: the historian and clergyman (17501829); the Old English scholar (17671858) or the educational reformer (17921846). Everard Feith's (1597-c.1625) short career was focused on ancient Greece. He is believed to have written five works on the subject, of which this is the second, before entering a house in La Rochelle and vanishing without trace in 1625. The manuscripts of his three final works were lost. Antiquitatum Homericarum was originally published by Bruman in 1677, apparently with the encouragment of J.F. Gronovius.   Ref: 51276 
£180
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Felltham, Owen: Resolues [Resolves] A Duple Century. The VI Edition [...] with a large Alphabeticall Table therunto. London: Printed for Henry Seile [...] 1636. Small 8vo., pp. [vi] 448 [xxii] + engraved title-page. Without final blank, two small burnholes to one leaf (one marginal, one affecting one character). Browned and spotted, a few pencil marks, one marginal wormhole to first 15 leaves. Modern quarter dark brown calf with marbled paper boards, red morocco gilt label to spine. Ink inscription to first leaf recto (blank): "E Libris Matthew Goodfellow, Ex Dono Thom Dom Baron Wyndham, 1726." The sixth edition of this popular collection of essays on moral topics, first published 1623, then with many additions in 1628. The inscription would seem to indicate that this copy was given to an acquaintance by Thomas, Baron Wyndham (1681-1745), Lord Chancellor of Ireland, though as he was only created Baron Wyndham in 1731, it is not an entirely straightforward assumption. ESTC S101862. STC 10761.   Ref: 23523  show full image..
£300
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