Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Gregson, Matthew: Portfolio of Fragments relative to the History and Antiquities, Topography and Genealogies of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster. [...] Third Edition, with Additions and Improvements [...] London: George Routledge and sons 1869. Folio, pp. [iv] xii 426 [ii] + frontispiece and 23 plates (4 folding). With illustrations (mostly heraldic, some in colour) throughout text, title page in red and black with gilt. Soiling (mostly light), some pages frayed at edges with repairs to margins and gutters of 7 leaves, a few plates tanned. Bound in modern half dark brown calf with red buckram boards, gilt ruling and red morocco label with gilt to spine. Small stamps of Bradford Public Library to title and one or two pages; "withdrawn" stamp and sellotape mark to verso of title, bookseller's embossment to half-title corner. Probably a large paper copy (pages 24.5 x 37.5 cm; list of subscribers to the large paper issue bound at front) of the third edition of this collection of genealogical and topographical information for Lancashire. Although the text is substantially that of the second edition, this is the first to include indexes one for the text and one for the large number coats of arms illustrated therein and introduces continuous pagination and a general table of contents (as the earlier editions had been published in parts).   Ref: 23117  show full image..
£350
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Grinnell-Milne, Duncan: The Killing William Rufus. An Investigation in the New Forest. Newton Abbott: David & Charles, 1968. First edition. 8vo., pp.174, [i] + frontispiece. Clean and bright within. Red cloth, gilt title to spine. Edges a little foxed but very good overall. Dust-jacket price-clipped and worn around the edges, still good. 'The author of this book has taken a new approach to medieval history. He has made a searching examination of the scene of the killing [of William Rufus], the small Stricknage Wood in the New Forest; this area has in fact "stood in almost changeless immobility since that sunlit evening long ago" [...]'.   Ref: 51864 
£25
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[Guide Book] (Green, Rupert:) A Brief History of Worcester; or, "Worcester Guide" Improved: [...] Fifth edition, with considerable Additions and Improvements. Worcester: Printed by J. Tymbs: 1806. 12mo., pp. [viii] 128 + folding frontispiece & 3 plates. Light browning and soiling, some spotting, edges untrimmed. Modern quarter leather with marbled boards, cloth spine label with gilt. Pencilled note to upper pastedown: "Bot. at Christie's sale of John Arlott's aquatint library, 29.10.87", ownership inscription of E. Houston dated 1814 to title, and ink gift note to initial blank dated 1890: "To Dr Gott, Dean of Worcester. From an old parishman at Bramley, 'in memory of many kindnesses received' and with the best wishes of one who will not forget the great good done to the whole parish when Dr Gott was vicar. (?)O'Riley, Bramley, Leeds." Possibly from the library of John Arlott, the author, cricket commentator, and collector of travel & natural history books. John Gott (1830-1906), 3rd Bishop of Truro, served as perpetual curate of Bramley and vicar of Leeds, becoming dean of Worcester in 1885 and Bishop of Truro in 1891, in which position he presided over the completion of Truro Cathedral.   Ref: 23493  show full image..
£125
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[Guide Book] Dodsworth, William; (Green, Rupert); et al: The Southampton Guide [...]; A Guide to the Cathedral Church at Salisbury [...]; The History and Antiquities of Glastonbury [...]; A Brief History of Worcester [...]: Southampton: T. Skelton; Salisbury: printed for the Author by B.C. Collins; London: J. Nichols; Birm [c.1805]; 1800; 1805; 1802. 4 works bound together. 8vo., pp.[ii], ii, 5-114; [vi], 78; vi, 7-48; [vi], 123, [i] + 3 copper engraved plates including folding frontispiece. Glastonbury and Worcester volumes bound with half-title pages, a few occasional illustrations and embellishments in the text. Sporadic light toning, mostly affecting the Worcester volume. Contemporary half tan calf, black gilt title label to spine, grey marbled paper-covered boards, edges sprinkled brown. Neatly rebacked with original (chipped) spine retained, rubbed, corners fraying, a little foxing to endpapers, but still a good and sound copy. To the front paste-down, armorial bookplate of Nathanael Ellison. To the ffep, two engravings of churches pasted in, both signed 'Matthews, Sculpt.'. Ownership inscription, 'Wynne, (Univ.?) College' to Worcester half-title. The second guide in this collection dates from an interesting time in the history of Salisbury Cathedral. Bishop Shute Barrington (17341826) employed the architect James Wyatt (17461813) to remodel the cathedral, resulting in its closure from 1789-92. Wyatt demolished the remains of the bell tower; drained and levelled the churchyard; removed the Perpendicular screen, two medieval chantry chapels and two porches; rearranged the medieval tombs and whitewashed or removed medieval wall paintings. Wyatt's remodelling was carried out in the name of creating a simpler interior, and the results were applauded by many of his contemporaries. However his disregard for the historical integrity of the Cathedral appalled the antiquary John Carter (17481817) and subsequent generations of historians. This guide offers a 'particular account of the great improvements made [...] under the direction of James Wyatt' and cites Wyatt's pre-works survey in Chapter III. ESTC T61869 (Salisbury)   Ref: 51456 
£200
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Haskins, Charles: (Wordsworth, C., trans.:) The Charter of Henry III (1227), with a translation [...] New Sarum in the Middle Ages and the History of St Edmund's College, Salisbury [...] Salisbury: The Salisbury Times, issued under the auspices of the Mayor and Corporation of Salisbury, 1927. Unbound (folded into quires but not sewn). 8vo., pp.[xvi], 62, [iv] + 12 plates. Additional title-page to front, 'In Commemoration of the Seventh Centenary of the Granting of King Henry III's Charter [...]'. Occasional small annotations in pen and pencil. A little toned towards front and rear, mark left by a clip to outermost pages, edges uncut. Still good.   Ref: 51854 
£20
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Hearne, Thomas: (Bliss, Philip, ed.:) Reliquiae Hearnianae: The Remains [...] Being Extracts from his MS. Diaries, Collected with a Few Notes [...] Oxford: printed for the Editor, by James Wright, Printer to the University, 1857. First edition, 2 vols., 8vo., pp. viii, 432; [iv], 433-985, [i] + portrait frontispiece to first volume. A little dampstaining at gutter to first few leaves of vol.I, otherwise internally bright. Contemporary tan half calf, red gilt morocco labels to spines, raised bands, marbled paper boards. Spines rubbed with a little loss to vol.I head-cap, joints and edges worn, corners worn with some just beginning to fray, still a good copy. A limited edition of 150 small and 50 large paper copies was produced, of which this is the smaller version.   Ref: 51401 
£150
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Hey, David: Yorkshire from AD 1000. London: Longman, 1986. Paperback. Minor shelf wear, very good. In the series, 'A Regional History of England'.   Ref: 51395 
£7
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Home, Gordon: Yorkshire, Painted and Described [...] London: Adam & Charles Black, 1908. First edition. 8vo., pp. xi, [i], 464, 8 + colour plates, and folding map at rear. Each plate preceeded by a printed tissue. 8-page publisher's catalogue to rear. Heavily decorated beige cloth, white and green rose and leaf motifs and gilt titles to spine and upper board, top edge gilt. Endcaps a bit creased, endpapers toned, very good. Gordon Cochrane Home (1878-1969) was an art editor at 'The Tatler', 'The King' and later at the publishers A & C Black. He worked largely in watercolours, many examples of which can be seen here, and was a frequent exhibitor at the Royal Academy.   Ref: 51687 
£40
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Horsley, John: Britannia Romana or the Roman Antiquities of Britain. Newcastle upon Tyne: Frank Graham, 1974. Second edition. Large folio (361 x 260mm), vi, [vi], xxxii, [iv], 520, [xxxx] +numerous b/w plates. A few first pages of the text, endpapers and edges foxed a little, otherwise internally clean. Blue cloth, black label to spine, gilt. Spine a little faded, edges spotted. A little used, still very good. Ex Libris 'Paul Ashbee' to front paste down. Copy no. 147 label to f.f.e.p. First published 1733. This edition, a facsimile reprint of the first edition with new introduction by Eric Birley, was is limited to 700 copies of which this is no. 147.   Ref: 48441 
£75
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Horsley, John: Britannia Romana: or the Roman Antiquities of Britain: In Three Books. The I. Contains... Roman Transactions... II.... the Roman Inscriptions and Sculptures... III. Contains the Roman Geography of Britain. London: Printed for John Osborn and Thomas Longman. 1732. Folio, pp. [viii], xxxii, 520, [xl] + 5 folded engraved maps and 100 other engraved plates. Includes half-title. Occasional light offsetting and a bit of marginal foxing but generally bright within. Occasional small, unobtrusive paper repairs, 9cm vertical closed tear to leaf 3G2 just touching a few letters near fore-edge. Early 19th-century tan diced Russia, five flat raised bands to heavily gilt spine, ornate gilt border within which a blind-tooled frame, blue marbled edges and endpapers, dark blue silk page marker bound in. Rebacked in calf with original, much darkened spine laid on. Edges worn, corners fraying, endpapers split at hinges but reback holding firm. A very good, sound copy. Two 19th-century armorial bookplates: to the front paste-down, Jeffrey Ekins (bap.1803); to the ffep, Sir Lambton Loraine (1838-1917). MS inscription of William Edward White dated 1953 to ffep recto. Ekins was the brother of Loraine's mother, Caroline Isabella (1804-1847). Sir Lambton Loraine was 11th Baron Loraine of Kirke Harle, Northumberland. His long career in the Royal Navy brought him some fame in 1873 during what became known as the 'Virginius Affair'. The American ship Virginius sailed from Jamaica in October of 1873 carrying weapons and ammunition along with 102 Cuban insurgent passengers, all destined to help fight the Spanish in Cuba. Before it could reach shore the Virginius was captured by the Spanish warship Tornado; a council of war was held by Spanish officials and who decided to begin executing the men on board, including the ship's Captain. On arriving at Santiago de Cuba harbour as Commander of the British warship HMS Niobe, Sir Lambton Loraine intervened by personally visiting the Spanish Military Commander of Santiago and refusing to leave his office until he ordered an end to the executions. His intervention saved the lives of the remaining insurgents and crew. His departure from New York the following year was recorded by the New York Times: 'The vessel moved out of her dock a few minutes after 1 o'clock, Sir Lambton standing by the gangway with his umbrella raised, puffing quietly on his cigar and waving adieus with his hat to the little groups of friends on the pier, who sent him off with a hearty cheer.' 'Horsley had been collecting material on the history of Roman Britain when, about 1727, he began working on them with a view to publication. He was assisted in various aspects of his antiquarian research by his friend and correspondent Robert Cay, and by George Mark, who was probably Horsley's assistant at his school in Morpeth. Mark helped to prepare the plans and drawings for Horsley's history, undertook archaeological tours and explorations, and made surveys, including one of Watling Street. He was also assisted by John Ward, professor of rhetoric at Gresham College, who helped revise the manuscript 'and communicated to him many important remarks for its improvement' (Nichols, Lit. anecdotes, 5.521). Horsley's work on Hadrian's Wall utilized material from Alexander Gordon's Itinerarium septentrionale (1726), though his reliance on this book largely went unacknowledged. The Britannia Romana, or, The Roman Antiquities of Britain was divided into three 'books'. The first contained the history of the Romans in Britain, with accounts of the legions stationed there, the Roman stations, and a substantial description of the Roman walls; the second 'book' contained a complete collection of the Roman inscriptions and sculptures found in Britain, together with historical and critical notes; the third 'book' contained a 'Roman geography of Britain', including all the extant ancient Roman accounts of Britain. Horsley wrote that the first 'book' had cost him: 'much labour and time in my study, to draw out an history of transactions, through so many ages, and at such a distance from our own times But I need not inform the world, that the second book was the most expensive and tedious. Several thousand miles were travelled on this account, to visit antient monuments I omitted no care nor pains, that was necessary to copy these with the greatest exactness, which was the principal design of the work.' (Horsley, Britannia Romana, 1732, i). The book's prefatory dedication to Sir Richard Ellys was written on 2 January 1732, but Horsley did not live to see the publication in early April of this, his greatest achievement. On 12 January he was, according to his friend Ward, 'suddenly and unexpectedly taken off by an apoplexy' (Hinde, 178). His exertions on his Roman history were thought to have contributed to his early death at the age of only forty-six [...] Despite occasional inevitable errors and inaccuracies, Horsley's Britannia Romana was one of the major antiquarian achievements of his day. F. Haverfield in The Roman Occupation of Britain (1924) described it as 'till quite lately the best and most scholarly account of any Roman province that had been written anywhere in Europe' (Haverfield, 75).' (ODNB) ESTC T115200.   Ref: 51872 
£850
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