Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Horsley, John: Britannia Romana: or the Roman Antiquities of Britain: In Three Books. The I. Contains... Roman Transactions... II.... the Roman Inscriptions and Sculptures... III. Contains the Roman Geography of Britain. London: Printed for John Osborn and Thomas Longman. 1732. Folio, pp. [viii], xxxii, 520, [xl] + 5 folded engraved maps and 100 other engraved plates. Includes half-title. Occasional light offsetting and a bit of marginal foxing but generally bright within. Occasional small, unobtrusive paper repairs, 9cm vertical closed tear to leaf 3G2 just touching a few letters near fore-edge. Early 19th-century tan diced Russia, five flat raised bands to heavily gilt spine, ornate gilt border within which a blind-tooled frame, blue marbled edges and endpapers, dark blue silk page marker bound in. Rebacked in calf with original, much darkened spine laid on. Edges worn, corners fraying, endpapers split at hinges but reback holding firm. A very good, sound copy. Two 19th-century armorial bookplates: to the front paste-down, Jeffrey Ekins (bap.1803); to the ffep, Sir Lambton Loraine (1838-1917). MS inscription of William Edward White dated 1953 to ffep recto. Ekins was the brother of Loraine's mother, Caroline Isabella (1804-1847). Sir Lambton Loraine was 11th Baron Loraine of Kirke Harle, Northumberland. His long career in the Royal Navy brought him some fame in 1873 during what became known as the 'Virginius Affair'. The American ship Virginius sailed from Jamaica in October of 1873 carrying weapons and ammunition along with 102 Cuban insurgent passengers, all destined to help fight the Spanish in Cuba. Before it could reach shore the Virginius was captured by the Spanish warship Tornado; a council of war was held by Spanish officials and who decided to begin executing the men on board, including the ship's Captain. On arriving at Santiago de Cuba harbour as Commander of the British warship HMS Niobe, Sir Lambton Loraine intervened by personally visiting the Spanish Military Commander of Santiago and refusing to leave his office until he ordered an end to the executions. His intervention saved the lives of the remaining insurgents and crew. His departure from New York the following year was recorded by the New York Times: 'The vessel moved out of her dock a few minutes after 1 o'clock, Sir Lambton standing by the gangway with his umbrella raised, puffing quietly on his cigar and waving adieus with his hat to the little groups of friends on the pier, who sent him off with a hearty cheer.' 'Horsley had been collecting material on the history of Roman Britain when, about 1727, he began working on them with a view to publication. He was assisted in various aspects of his antiquarian research by his friend and correspondent Robert Cay, and by George Mark, who was probably Horsley's assistant at his school in Morpeth. Mark helped to prepare the plans and drawings for Horsley's history, undertook archaeological tours and explorations, and made surveys, including one of Watling Street. He was also assisted by John Ward, professor of rhetoric at Gresham College, who helped revise the manuscript 'and communicated to him many important remarks for its improvement' (Nichols, Lit. anecdotes, 5.521). Horsley's work on Hadrian's Wall utilized material from Alexander Gordon's Itinerarium septentrionale (1726), though his reliance on this book largely went unacknowledged. The Britannia Romana, or, The Roman Antiquities of Britain was divided into three 'books'. The first contained the history of the Romans in Britain, with accounts of the legions stationed there, the Roman stations, and a substantial description of the Roman walls; the second 'book' contained a complete collection of the Roman inscriptions and sculptures found in Britain, together with historical and critical notes; the third 'book' contained a 'Roman geography of Britain', including all the extant ancient Roman accounts of Britain. Horsley wrote that the first 'book' had cost him: 'much labour and time in my study, to draw out an history of transactions, through so many ages, and at such a distance from our own times But I need not inform the world, that the second book was the most expensive and tedious. Several thousand miles were travelled on this account, to visit antient monuments I omitted no care nor pains, that was necessary to copy these with the greatest exactness, which was the principal design of the work.' (Horsley, Britannia Romana, 1732, i). The book's prefatory dedication to Sir Richard Ellys was written on 2 January 1732, but Horsley did not live to see the publication in early April of this, his greatest achievement. On 12 January he was, according to his friend Ward, 'suddenly and unexpectedly taken off by an apoplexy' (Hinde, 178). His exertions on his Roman history were thought to have contributed to his early death at the age of only forty-six [...] Despite occasional inevitable errors and inaccuracies, Horsley's Britannia Romana was one of the major antiquarian achievements of his day. F. Haverfield in The Roman Occupation of Britain (1924) described it as 'till quite lately the best and most scholarly account of any Roman province that had been written anywhere in Europe' (Haverfield, 75).' (ODNB) ESTC T115200.   Ref: 51872 
£850
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(Howell, James:) Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren; Divided into Six Sections, Partly: Historicall, Politicall, Philosophicall, Upon Emergent Occasions. London: printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1645. First edition. Small 4to. (195 x 150mm), pp. [xx], 88, 120, 40, 48, 92, (ii). Lacks additional engraved title-page. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces, a few pencil marks and underlinings, some ms notes in an old hand including dates and sometimes locations appended to the foot of each letter (according to a note in the same hand, added from the 1737 edition). Occasional wax marks not affecting text. 19th-century plum-coloured faux morocco, gilt label to spine, blind-stamped spine and boards, edges sprinkled red, marbled endpapers. Rubbed, edges a bit worn with some fraying to corners, spine label lifting. Armorial bookplate of Frederick William Cosens to front paste-down, to which is added a ms gift inscription to Allan H. Bright dated 30th May 1891, from H.Y.S.. Armorial bookplate of (Douglas Kinnaird) to title page verso. Tipped to the f.f.e.p., a page of handwritten notes on the content of the book with a brief chronology of Howell's life in pencil beneath. Also added in pencil at the top of the page, a note that the book was purchased from the Cosens sale through Quaritch for £1.4.6 on 20th November 1890. Relatedly, to the f.f.e.p. verso is a note from the disgruntled collector describing both this purchase of the book and his subsequent discovery of the absence of the engraved title-page. Frederick William Cosens (1819-1889) was a wine merchant, writer and collector of books and art. His library was so extensive that when it was sold by Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge in the winter of 1890 the sale ran over 14 days and comprised 4995 lots. We believe the second bookplate to be that of Douglas Kinnaird (1788-1830) son of George, 7th Lord Kinnaird and a great friend of Byron. He handled Byron's literary and financial affairs in England after he left in 1816.   Ref: 49912 
£300
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Hoyle, R.W. (ed.): Early Tudor Craven: Subsidies and Assessments, 1510-1547. Leeds: The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1987. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxxiii, 148. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, edges lightly dusted. The Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series Volume CXLV for the Year 1985.   Ref: 40837 
£10
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Hunter, Joseph: Hallamshire. The History and Topography of the Parish of Sheffield in the County of York: with Historical and Descriptive Notices of the Parishes of Ecclesfield, Hansworth, Treeton, and Whiston, and of the Chapelry of Bradfield. London: Printed for the Author, by Richard and Arthur Taylor: Published by Lackington, Hughes, Hardi 1819. Large paper copy, folio, pp.x, [ii], 299, [i] + engraved portrait frontispiece and 8 further plates, further engravings in the text. List of subscribers. Occasional marginalia, plates slightly foxed, small tears to frontis., title and leaf 2Q, all repaired. Recent half brown calf with marbled paper boards, gilt and blind tooling to spine, t.e.g., other edges uncut. Some light scuffs to spine, edges dusty, very good. Embossed stamp 'Ex Libris LMP MCMLXII' to f.f.e.p.. Letter dated 1925 to Mrs Dearden of Attercliffe Common, Sheffield loosely inserted. Joseph Hunter (1783-1861) established his reputation as an antiquary relatively late in life with this study of the Sheffield area, and a follow-up on Doncaster a decade later. He performed his research in London and Oxford on holidays from his home in Somerset, finding time to also visit his home city of Sheffield when he could, and borrowing manuscripts when he couldn't.   Ref: 49000 
£300
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Jusserand, J.J.: La Vie Nomade et Les Routes D'Angleterre au XIVe Siecle. Paris: Hachette, 1884. 8vo., pp. [iv], 306, [i]. Quarter black roan with marbled boards, spine in seven compartments with raised bands, gilt. Rubbed, corners a bit bumped and worn, marbled endpapers, preliminaries darkened a little but text block clean, edges uncut. General dustiness but still a good copy. Author's inscription to Gaston Paris, a philantropist nominated for the Nobel Prize in 1901, 1902 and 1903. Stamp of St. Ignatius College, Amsterdam to f.f.e.p. In the series 'Les Anglais Au Moyen Age'.   Ref: 47491 
£60
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Kennett, White: Parochial Antiquities Attempted in the History of Ambrosden, Burcester, and Other Adjacent Parts in the Counties of Oxford and Bucks. Oxford: Printed at the Theater 1695. First edition. 4to., pp. [xvi] 703 [cxlvi] + 9 plates (8 folding). Spotted and intermittently browned, small burnholes to 2 leaves causing loss of at most 2 letters, a spot of marginal worming at end (once just touching a letter), a few pencil and early ink marginal notes (some shaved). Later calf, boards bordered in gilt line and blind rolls (with gilt cornerpieces), sometime rebacked with gilt-ruled and stamped spine, red and green morocco labels with gilt, hinges relined with strong paper, scratched, rubbed around the edges, corners & sides worn, leather peeling a bit on upper board. The first edition of "the first substantial parish history", which, "tracing the land tenures in north Oxfordshire before and after the Norman conquest, [...] showed that a new structure of landholding was imposed by William I" (ODNB). "The volume contains nine plates of churches and seats, by Michael Burghers, distinguished by a certain kind of character, like that of the Flemish school of painters, which is exceedingly amusing and attractive" (Cens. Lit., 2nd edn., Art. CCCXXIII). Upcott III 1070.   Ref: 23540  show full image..
£500
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Laborde, E. D.: Byrhtnoth and Maldon. London: William Heinemann Ltd., 1936. First edition. 8vo., pp. viii, 166. Cloth, gilt-lettered, spine faded, edges dusted, very good. Ex Libris bookplate of G. E. Selby to front paste-down, ownership inscription of 'E. D. J. Dixon. 1977' to f f.f.e.p. verso, two newspaper articles about the book stuck to f.f.e.p.,   Ref: 49151 
£40
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Langtoft, Peter; (Hearne, Thomas, ed.): Peter Langtoft's Chronicle, (as illustrated and improv'd by Robert of Brunne) from the Death of Cadwalader to the end of K. Edward the First's Reign. Transcrib'd, and now first publish'd, from a MS. in the Inner-Temple Library [...] Oxford: printed at the Theatre, 1725. 2 vols. 8vo., pp. ccxxxii, 230; [ii], 235-722, [ii]. List of subscribers to vol.I, vol.II with its own title-page and a single-leaf advertisement to rear. Woodcut head- and tail-pieces and a few initials. A little sporadic foxing and light toning but generally clean. Recently rebound in mustard half calf, raised bands, spines blind tooled and highlighted in green with a little gilt, orange spine labels with gilt titles, dark brown marbled boards, edges sprinkled brown and red, endpapers renewed, very good. Uniformly bound with our stock number 51815, Antiquarii Warwicensis Historia Regum Angliae (1745). Peter Langtoft (d. in or after 1305) was a chronicler, and Augustinian canon of Bridlington Priory. 'With twenty-one medieval manuscripts still surviving, his work seems to have been the most widely diffused Anglo-Norman chronicle after the Brut d'Engleterre and Wace's Brut. His chronicle consists in fact of three books, all of them in verse: an abridgement and adaptation of Wace's Brut, 3010 lines long; a history of Saxon and Norman kings until the death of Henry III, 4200 lines long; and a history of Edward I, with whom he was contemporary. This third book, which is the most informative, consists of 2022 lines in its first redaction and 2591 lines in its second.' (ODNB) ESTC T154205   Ref: 51817 
£350
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Lapidge, Michael (ed.): Anglo Saxon England 31. Cambridge University Press, 2002. First edition. 8vo, pp. ix, 368. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, small remainder mark to edge, otherwise as new.   Ref: 49045 
£15
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Lapidge, Michael, et al. (ed.): Anglo Saxon England 33. Cambridge University Press, 2004. First edition. 8vo., pp. x, 393. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, edges lightly dusted, small remainder mark to edge.   Ref: 49024 
£15
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