Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

(Howell, James:) Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren; Divided into Six Sections, Partly: Historicall, Politicall, Philosophicall, Upon Emergent Occasions. London: printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1645. First edition. Small 4to. (195 x 150mm), pp. [xx], 88, 120, 40, 48, 92, (ii). Lacks additional engraved title-page. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces, a few pencil marks and underlinings, some ms notes in an old hand including dates and sometimes locations appended to the foot of each letter (according to a note in the same hand, added from the 1737 edition). Occasional wax marks not affecting text. 19th-century plum-coloured faux morocco, gilt label to spine, blind-stamped spine and boards, edges sprinkled red, marbled endpapers. Rubbed, edges a bit worn with some fraying to corners, spine label lifting. Armorial bookplate of Frederick William Cosens to front paste-down, to which is added a ms gift inscription to Allan H. Bright dated 30th May 1891, from H.Y.S.. Armorial bookplate of (Douglas Kinnaird) to title page verso. Tipped to the f.f.e.p., a page of handwritten notes on the content of the book with a brief chronology of Howell's life in pencil beneath. Also added in pencil at the top of the page, a note that the book was purchased from the Cosens sale through Quaritch for £1.4.6 on 20th November 1890. Relatedly, to the f.f.e.p. verso is a note from the disgruntled collector describing both this purchase of the book and his subsequent discovery of the absence of the engraved title-page. Frederick William Cosens (1819-1889) was a wine merchant, writer and collector of books and art. His library was so extensive that when it was sold by Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge in the winter of 1890 the sale ran over 14 days and comprised 4995 lots. We believe the second bookplate to be that of Douglas Kinnaird (1788-1830) son of George, 7th Lord Kinnaird and a great friend of Byron. He handled Byron's literary and financial affairs in England after he left in 1816.   Ref: 49912 
£300
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Hoyle, R.W. (ed.): Early Tudor Craven: Subsidies and Assessments, 1510-1547. Leeds: The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1987. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxxiii, 148. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, edges lightly dusted. The Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series Volume CXLV for the Year 1985.   Ref: 40837 
£10
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Hunter, Joseph: Hallamshire. The History and Topography of the Parish of Sheffield in the County of York: with Historical and Descriptive Notices of the Parishes of Ecclesfield, Hansworth, Treeton, and Whiston, and of the Chapelry of Bradfield. London: Printed for the Author, by Richard and Arthur Taylor: Published by Lackington, Hughes, Hardi 1819. Large paper copy, folio, pp.x, [ii], 299, [i] + engraved portrait frontispiece and 8 further plates, further engravings in the text. List of subscribers. Occasional marginalia, plates slightly foxed, small tears to frontis., title and leaf 2Q, all repaired. Recent half brown calf with marbled paper boards, gilt and blind tooling to spine, t.e.g., other edges uncut. Some light scuffs to spine, edges dusty, very good. Embossed stamp 'Ex Libris LMP MCMLXII' to f.f.e.p.. Letter dated 1925 to Mrs Dearden of Attercliffe Common, Sheffield loosely inserted. Joseph Hunter (1783-1861) established his reputation as an antiquary relatively late in life with this study of the Sheffield area, and a follow-up on Doncaster a decade later. He performed his research in London and Oxford on holidays from his home in Somerset, finding time to also visit his home city of Sheffield when he could, and borrowing manuscripts when he couldn't.   Ref: 49000 
£300
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Jusserand, J.J.: La Vie Nomade et Les Routes D'Angleterre au XIVe Siecle. Paris: Hachette, 1884. 8vo., pp. [iv], 306, [i]. Quarter black roan with marbled boards, spine in seven compartments with raised bands, gilt. Rubbed, corners a bit bumped and worn, marbled endpapers, preliminaries darkened a little but text block clean, edges uncut. General dustiness but still a good copy. Author's inscription to Gaston Paris, a philantropist nominated for the Nobel Prize in 1901, 1902 and 1903. Stamp of St. Ignatius College, Amsterdam to f.f.e.p. In the series 'Les Anglais Au Moyen Age'.   Ref: 47491 
£60
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Kennett, White: Parochial Antiquities Attempted in the History of Ambrosden, Burcester, and Other Adjacent Parts in the Counties of Oxford and Bucks. Oxford: Printed at the Theater 1695. First edition. 4to., pp. [xvi] 703 [cxlvi] + 9 plates (8 folding). Spotted and intermittently browned, small burnholes to 2 leaves causing loss of at most 2 letters, a spot of marginal worming at end (once just touching a letter), a few pencil and early ink marginal notes (some shaved). Later calf, boards bordered in gilt line and blind rolls (with gilt cornerpieces), sometime rebacked with gilt-ruled and stamped spine, red and green morocco labels with gilt, hinges relined with strong paper, scratched, rubbed around the edges, corners & sides worn, leather peeling a bit on upper board. The first edition of "the first substantial parish history", which, "tracing the land tenures in north Oxfordshire before and after the Norman conquest, [...] showed that a new structure of landholding was imposed by William I" (ODNB). "The volume contains nine plates of churches and seats, by Michael Burghers, distinguished by a certain kind of character, like that of the Flemish school of painters, which is exceedingly amusing and attractive" (Cens. Lit., 2nd edn., Art. CCCXXIII). Upcott III 1070.   Ref: 23540  show full image..
£500
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Kilburne, Richard: A Topographie or Survey of the County of Kent. With Some Chronological, Historicall, and Other Matters Touching the Same: and the Several Parishes and Places therein. London: Thomas Mabb for Henry Atkinson [...], 1659. Small 4to. (177 x 135mm), pp. [viii], 422, [xii] + portrait frontispiece. Numerous errors in pagination as usual, list of Contents incorrectly bound before the dedication rather than after. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Occasional light smudges and spots of foxing, a little toning along head of title-page, a smudge of red pigment to tail edge of final leaf perhaps indicating the original edge colour. Late 19th- or early 20th-century brown polished sheep neatly rebacked with original spine retained, gilt title and blind tooling to spine, blind-tooled borders to boards, edges marbled, grey endpapers. A little rubbed but a very good copy overall. Recent armorial bookplate of Robert Edmund Lloyd-Roberts to front paste-down. Two MS pencil notes to the ffep verso, the first concerning the placement of the list of Contents, the second recording that this book was 'acquired at the sale at Godmersham Park, the home of Mrs Robert Tritton. 8th June 1983.' Built in 1732 by Thomas May (later Knight), Godmersham Park was inherited by Edward Austen (brother of Jane Austen) in 1794. He was a cousin of the Knight family, who had adopted him in the early 1780s; when his adoptive mother died in 1812 he changed his name to Knight. Jane was a regular visitor to Godmersham Park and is said to have used the house as a model for Mansfield Park. The house passed through several more hands before being bought in 1935 by Robert Tritton and his wife Elsie, whose death in 1983 prompted the Christie's auction mentioned above. In his 'Epistle Dedicatory', Kilburne writes of his intention to present 'the Kent of his own day', and to depict 'the county as it was before the Civil War'. Hasted, in his 1797 History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, dismisses Kilburne's work as being 'little more than a Directory'. However, 'Kent was not well served by early topographers, and Kilburne's small survey was extensively quoted on sixteen occasions by Robert Furley and, over the years in Archaeologia Cantiana, as a first source of reference, and not without some praise. The Topographie devoted disproportionate attention to Hawkhurst: 10 pages out of 422, or, in the words of one writer, 'as much space to it as to twenty other average parishes' (Archaeologia Cantiana, 5, 1863, 59). Kilburne justified this, however: "In respect I finde not any description of this Parish it having been the place of my habitation for above twenty eight years last past (God's Providence having also there lent me an inheritance), I thought fit to enlarge my selfe upon this place. (Kilburne, 126)"'. (ODNB)   Ref: 50494 
£650
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Laborde, E. D.: Byrhtnoth and Maldon. London: William Heinemann Ltd., 1936. First edition. 8vo., pp. viii, 166. Cloth, gilt-lettered, spine faded, edges dusted, very good. Ex Libris bookplate of G. E. Selby to front paste-down, ownership inscription of 'E. D. J. Dixon. 1977' to f f.f.e.p. verso, two newspaper articles about the book stuck to f.f.e.p.,   Ref: 49151 
£40
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Langtoft, Peter; (Hearne, Thomas, ed.): Peter Langtoft's Chronicle, (as illustrated and improv'd by Robert of Brunne) from the Death of Cadwalader to the end of K. Edward the First's Reign. Transcrib'd, and now first publish'd, from a MS. in the Inner-Temple Library [...] Oxford: printed at the Theatre, 1725. 2 vols. 8vo., pp. ccxxxii, 230; [ii], 235-722, [ii]. List of subscribers to vol.I, vol.II with its own title-page and a single-leaf advertisement to rear. Woodcut head- and tail-pieces and a few initials. A little sporadic foxing and light toning but generally clean. Recently rebound in mustard half calf, raised bands, spines blind tooled and highlighted in green with a little gilt, orange spine labels with gilt titles, dark brown marbled boards, edges sprinkled brown and red, endpapers renewed, very good. Uniformly bound with our stock number 51815, Antiquarii Warwicensis Historia Regum Angliae (1745). Peter Langtoft (d. in or after 1305) was a chronicler, and Augustinian canon of Bridlington Priory. 'With twenty-one medieval manuscripts still surviving, his work seems to have been the most widely diffused Anglo-Norman chronicle after the Brut d'Engleterre and Wace's Brut. His chronicle consists in fact of three books, all of them in verse: an abridgement and adaptation of Wace's Brut, 3010 lines long; a history of Saxon and Norman kings until the death of Henry III, 4200 lines long; and a history of Edward I, with whom he was contemporary. This third book, which is the most informative, consists of 2022 lines in its first redaction and 2591 lines in its second.' (ODNB) ESTC T154205   Ref: 51817 
£350
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Lapidge, Michael (ed.): Anglo Saxon England 31. Cambridge University Press, 2002. First edition. 8vo, pp. ix, 368. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, small remainder mark to edge, otherwise as new.   Ref: 49045 
£15
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Lapidge, Michael, et al. (ed.): Anglo Saxon England 33. Cambridge University Press, 2004. First edition. 8vo., pp. x, 393. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, edges lightly dusted, small remainder mark to edge.   Ref: 49024 
£15
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