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Browne, Philip: The History of Norwich, from the Earliest Records to the Present Time. Norwich: Printed and sold by Bacon, Kinnebrook, and Co. 1814. First edition. 8vo., pp. [ii] 358 + frontispiece and 4 plates. Foxed or browned in places, a little occasional soiling, slight loss to blank corner of one leaf. Contemporary half calf with mottled paper boards, gilt ruling and stamp to spine; head of joints and corners neatly repaired, bottom part of upper joint now weakening, a little rubbing to all joints and slight wear to sides. Bookplate removed from upper pastedown. The plates include views of the cathedral, castle, and marketplace in Norwich.   Ref: 22645 
£200
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Browne, Thomas: Hydriotaphia, Urne-Buriall, or, a Discourse of the Sepulchrall Urnes lately found in Norfolk. Together with the Garden of Cyrus, or the Quincunciall, Lozenge, or Net-work Plantations of the Ancients, Artificially, Naturally, Mystically Considered. With Sundry Observations. London: Printed for Hen. Brome, 1658. First edition. 8vo., pp.[xvi], 102 (i.e. 202 misnumbered), [vi]. Two full-page engraved illustrations plus one smaller illustration to the text, woodcut inititals and head-pieces, separate title-page to The Garden of Cyrus all three unpaginated leaves at end (‘The Stationer to the Reader’, ‘Books Printed for Hen. Broome [...]’, ‘Dr. Brown’s Garden of Cyrus’). Head edge trimmed a little close in places but causing no loss of text, final two gatherings lightly dampstained, occasional faint spots and smudges. Slightly later limp vellum, edges lightly sprinkled brown. Vellum rumpled and a little grubby, ties lost, endpapers replaced but still very good. An MS sum to final leaf verso, slightly trimmed at head. Ownership inscription of Robert Lascelles Carr (1776-1811) to title-page. Carr was curate of St. Mary & St. George, Stamford, and chaplain to Lord Mendip. Two years before his death Carr had been the defendant in a libel trial: Charles Sanders, a fellow Stamford clergyman, accused Carr of ‘attributing to the plaintiff [Sanders] that he had been guilty of sodomitical practices, and that he had been obliged to leave Manchester, where he formerly lived, on account of being known to have such a propensity.’ (Stamford Mercury, 17th March 1809). It transpired during the trial that Carr and Sanders had been candidates for the same job, the Confratership of Brown's Hospital in Stamford, and the jury found in Sanders’ favour, ordering Carr to pay £200 in damages (£20,000 approx. in modern terms). St. Mary’s houses Carr’s ‘neat but plain’ monument, and his local newspaper obituary gives some interesting insights into his character: ‘a man of enlarged and benevolent mind, possessed of powers which adversity had of late injured [....] His zeal was never without knowledge, but it was sometimes excersised in contempt of worldly prudence. It was devoted to religion, and it was instantaneously animated by the call of friendship, or of misfortune; but as it led him to express the real sentiments of his heart without reference to circumstances, it laid the foundation of many a bitter grief.’ (The History of Stamford (1822), pp.270-1). Browne’s (1605–1682) is one of the earliest English archaeological monographs, here found as usual with his work on ancient styles of planting. Hydriotaphia [...] was written for Thomas Le Gros of Crostwick, and The Garden of Cyrus for Nicholas Bacon of Gillingham; they were published together in 1658. ‘Although professedly works of invention, and therefore displaying Religio Medici's wide and witty imagination, Hydriotaphia and The Garden of Cyrus had serious ends in view. They were written, like Pseudodoxia, out of books as well as experience, extracting and reweaving much erudite information on the funerary and horticultural practices of the ancients to provide a large context for personal observations. Hydriotaphia may be one of the first archaeological monographs in English, but the pictured and comparatively briefly described urns, now in the British Museum, are Saxon rather than (as Browne tentatively guessed) Roman, and the work's sole contribution to knowledge was Browne's discovery ‘in an Hydropicall body ten years buried in a Church-yard’ of ‘a fat concretion’ (later termed ‘adipocere’). The tract has been enjoyed less for factual content than for its wit and solemn music, from the first chapter's reflection that the shallow burial of the deceased has ‘left unto our view some parts, which they never beheld themselves’ to the concluding declamation on the futility of all monuments compared to ‘the extasie of being ever’. The addressee lost his father, Browne's patient, Sir Charles Le Gros, in 1656, which suggests that the much admired peroration on the triumph of Christian immortality over time, death, and oblivion was always the ultimate goal of the piece. The Garden of Cyrus, after expounding ancient patterns of planting, including much modern botanical information, and gathering together examples of quintuplicity in human artefacts, the natural world, and pagan and Christian numerology, likewise concludes in religious mood, invoking ‘the mystical Mathematicks of the City of Heaven’ which will ordain ‘that time, when … all shall awake again’. Nicholas Bacon, too, had recently been bereaved, in his case of successive heads of the family, his uncles Sir Edmund Bacon (Browne's ‘true and noble friend’) and Sir Robert Bacon, premier baronets, in 1649 and 1655. The dedication justifies coupling the tracts ‘since the delightful world comes after death, and paradise succeeds the grave; since the verdant state of things is the symbol of the Resurrection, and to flourish in the state of glory, we must first be sown in corruption’. Both tracts, therefore, may have been conceived as works of consolation, exercises in the genre of Seneca's Moral Essays.’ (ODNB) ESTC R202039; Keynes 93; Wing B5154   Ref: 51729 
£1250
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Burchill, Julie and Parsons, Tony: “The Boy Looked at Johnny”, The Obituary of Rock and Roll. London: Pluto Press, 1982. Third impression, original paperback first edition. 8vo., pp.96. Illustrated card covers. Spine a little faded, some slight smudgy marks to white rear cover, very good. First published 1978, second impression 1980, this third impression 1982.   Ref: 51646 
£35
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Burke, John: Encyclopaedia of Heraldry, Or General Armory of England, Scotland, and Ireland. London: Henry G. Bohn, 1851. 8vo. pp. xxvi, [1109] + chromolithographed additional title. Armorial engravings within text. Printed title and dedication leaf stained, a little spotting elsewhere. Old half green pebbled roan, textured cloth boards, spine in six compartments with raised bands, second compartment gilt-lettered direct, a bit rubbed, slight wear to extremitites. Two ownership inscriptions to f.f.e.p., one dated 1950 and the second “F. J. Thornton, 1943” with F. J. Thornton ownership stamp also to f.f.e.p. “Edmund Reynolds” hand-written to top edge of textblock, “E” to fore edge. The third edition, with a supplement, of Burke’s encyclopedia of heraldry.   Ref: 28937  show full image..
£95
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Burn, John Southerden: The History of Parish Registers in England. London: John Russell Smith, 1863. 8vo., pp. 296. Bookplate and ownership stamp to f.f.e.p. Brown original Cloth. Head and tail of spine a little frayed, corners bumped, but very good.   Ref: 37661  show full image..
£40
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Burnet, Gilbert: An Exhortation to Peace and Union. A Sermon at St Lawrence-Jury, at the Election of Lord Mayor of London, on the 29th of September, 1681. London: Printed for Richard Chiswell. 1681. Sm. 4to., pp. [iv], 35, [i]. First and last leaves a bit soiled, faint dampmark to upper corner. Recent quarter calf by Chris Weston, paste paper boards, red morocco label lettered vertically. Contemporary - but not Burnet's - ink inscription "Dr Burnet / Hoc facio de charitate et spiritus / tenuis & stylo facili" [This I make out of charity with a humble (or modest) spirit and easy pen]. A remarkable sermon preached at the request of the retiring Lord Mayor, Patience Ward, upon the election of John Moore - the high level of partisan conflict created the unusual circumstance of an election for the post - arguing for Protestant unity against a common enemy, Catholicism. ESTC R20821.   Ref: 36016 
£75
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Burton, William: A Commentary on Antoninus his Itinerary, or Journies of the Romane Empire, so far as it Concerneth Britain [...] London: printed by Tho. Roycroft (for) Henry Twyford, and T. Twyford, 1658. Small folio (285 x 190mm), pp. [xx], 266, [vi] + 2 plates: portrait frontispiece (by Hollar) and double-page map. Lacking single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader' (but see below). Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, illustrations in the text, errata to final leaf verso. Small burn-hole to pp.33-4 just touching a few letters, pp. 141-2 creased during binding, very occasional spotting and a few slight smudges, front and rear blanks darkened at edges. Contemporary calf, gilt-ruled panels with various mottled effects, all edges gilt, rebacked with dark brown morocco, original spine label retained. Spine rubbed, a few chips, inner hinges relined with tape, marbled front pastedown but no marbled flyleaf. Armorial bookplate of Robert N. Pemberton and bookplate of T.H. Ellison to front pastedown. Underneath the Pemberton plate a piece of paper crossed through in ink, possibly patching a removed third bookplate. Latin annotation in an old hand to preliminary blank. ESTC calls for 22 pages of preliminaries but a number of copies, including those in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and others in libraries and sale records, have only 20 pages, being without the single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader'. This leaf, a singleton signed 'a', may have been more frequently omitted because the ‘Catalogue of Authors’ which would follow it is also signed 'a'. William Burton (1609-1657) is sometimes confused with another of the same name, the younger brother of Robert Burton and author of 'The Description of Leicestershire', but this Burton was more adept at philology. He died of palsy shortly before the completion of this work. ESTC R6432; Wing B6185   Ref: 49120 
£750
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[Bury St Edmunds:] A Concise Description of Bury Saint Edmund’s, and its Environs, [...] London: Sold by Longman & Co., [...] 1827. 8vo., pp. iv [6] 367 (i.e. 369) [5] + 27 plates. One marginal ink note (by R.M. H-H, see below), a few small pencil marks, some waterstaining and a touch of foxing to plates (and a few nearby leaves), a little browning and light spotting, still a good copy. Quarter tan cloth with pasteboard boards, edges untrimmed, rebacked with free endpapers renewed, new printed spine label, light wear to sides, a bit of soiling. Armorial bookplate of R.M. Harbord-Hamond and ownership inscription of Thomas Layton F.S.A. (1883) to upper pastedown. This copy once belonged to the antiquarian and collector Thomas Layton (1819-1911), whose collection is now split between the Museum of London and the Hounslow Library; it had in his lifetime filled his house and some 30 outbuildings. Later it came into the possession of Richard Morden Harbord-Hamond, 10th Baron Suffield (1865-1951), a Vice-Admiral in the Royal Navy, who has added a pen note at the mention of Robert Walpole, Esq., describing how some books of Walpole’s wife and father-in-law came into his hands.   Ref: 22742  show full image..
£195
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Butler, William: Danish Gambit. London: Peter Owen, 1966. First edition. 8vo., pp. 167, [i]. 8vo., pp. 167, [i]. Edges slightly foxed but clean and bright within. Brown cloth, gilt title to spine. Tiny mark to front paste-down, near fine. Dust-jacket a little toned but only visible to verso, a little shelf-wear but very good.   Ref: 49525 
£25
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Böll, Heinrich: (Vennewitz, Leila, trans.:) The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum, or: How Violence Develops and Where It Can Lead New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1975. First US edition. 8vo., pp. 140, [iv]. Black cloth, gilt title to spine, red and gilt title label to upper board, top edge red, near fine. A little very light shelf wear to dust-jacket, but near fine. Originally published in German as Die Verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum, oder: Wie Gevalt Entstehen und Wohin Sie Führen Kann by Kiepenheuer & Witsch, Cologne, 1974.   Ref: 51647 
£20
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