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Burke, John: Encyclopaedia of Heraldry, Or General Armory of England, Scotland, and Ireland. London: Henry G. Bohn, 1851. 8vo. pp. xxvi, [1109] + chromolithographed additional title. Armorial engravings within text. Printed title and dedication leaf stained, a little spotting elsewhere. Old half green pebbled roan, textured cloth boards, spine in six compartments with raised bands, second compartment gilt-lettered direct, a bit rubbed, slight wear to extremitites. Two ownership inscriptions to f.f.e.p., one dated 1950 and the second "F. J. Thornton, 1943" with F. J. Thornton ownership stamp also to f.f.e.p. "Edmund Reynolds" hand-written to top edge of textblock, "E" to fore edge. The third edition, with a supplement, of Burke's encyclopedia of heraldry.   Ref: 28937  show full image..
£95
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Burn, John Southerden: The History of Parish Registers in England. London: John Russell Smith, 1863. 8vo., pp. 296. Bookplate and ownership stamp to f.f.e.p. Brown original Cloth. Head and tail of spine a little frayed, corners bumped, but very good.   Ref: 37661  show full image..
£40
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Burnet, Gilbert: An Exhortation to Peace and Union. A Sermon at St Lawrence-Jury, at the Election of Lord Mayor of London, on the 29th of September, 1681. London: Printed for Richard Chiswell. 1681. Sm. 4to., pp. [iv], 35, [i]. First and last leaves a bit soiled, faint dampmark to upper corner. Recent quarter calf by Chris Weston, paste paper boards, red morocco label lettered vertically. Contemporary - but not Burnet's - ink inscription "Dr Burnet / Hoc facio de charitate et spiritus / tenuis & stylo facili" [This I make out of charity with a humble (or modest) spirit and easy pen]. A remarkable sermon preached at the request of the retiring Lord Mayor, Patience Ward, upon the election of John Moore - the high level of partisan conflict created the unusual circumstance of an election for the post - arguing for Protestant unity against a common enemy, Catholicism. ESTC R20821.   Ref: 36016 
£75
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Burton, William: A Commentary on Antoninus his Itinerary, or Journies of the Romane Empire, so far as it Concerneth Britain [...] London: printed by Tho. Roycroft (for) Henry Twyford, and T. Twyford, 1658. Small folio (285 x 190mm), pp. [xx], 266, [vi] + 2 plates: portrait frontispiece (by Hollar) and double-page map. Lacking single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader' (but see below). Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, illustrations in the text, errata to final leaf verso. Small burn-hole to pp.33-4 just touching a few letters, pp. 141-2 creased during binding, very occasional spotting and a few slight smudges, front and rear blanks darkened at edges. Contemporary calf, gilt-ruled panels with various mottled effects, all edges gilt, rebacked with dark brown morocco, original spine label retained. Spine rubbed, a few chips, inner hinges relined with tape, marbled front pastedown but no marbled flyleaf. Armorial bookplate of Robert N. Pemberton and bookplate of T.H. Ellison to front pastedown. Underneath the Pemberton plate a piece of paper crossed through in ink, possibly patching a removed third bookplate. Latin annotation in an old hand to preliminary blank. ESTC calls for 22 pages of preliminaries but a number of copies, including those in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and others in libraries and sale records, have only 20 pages, being without the single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader'. This leaf, a singleton signed 'a', may have been more frequently omitted because the 'Catalogue of Authors' which would follow it is also signed 'a'. William Burton (1609-1657) is sometimes confused with another of the same name, the younger brother of Robert Burton and author of 'The Description of Leicestershire', but this Burton was more adept at philology. He died of palsy shortly before the completion of this work. ESTC R6432; Wing B6185   Ref: 49120 
£750
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[Bury St Edmunds:] A Concise Description of Bury Saint Edmund's, and its Environs, [...] London: Sold by Longman & Co., [...] 1827. 8vo., pp. iv [6] 367 (i.e. 369) [5] + 27 plates. One marginal ink note (by R.M. H-H, see below), a few small pencil marks, some waterstaining and a touch of foxing to plates (and a few nearby leaves), a little browning and light spotting, still a good copy. Quarter tan cloth with pasteboard boards, edges untrimmed, rebacked with free endpapers renewed, new printed spine label, light wear to sides, a bit of soiling. Armorial bookplate of R.M. Harbord-Hamond and ownership inscription of Thomas Layton F.S.A. (1883) to upper pastedown. This copy once belonged to the antiquarian and collector Thomas Layton (1819-1911), whose collection is now split between the Museum of London and the Hounslow Library; it had in his lifetime filled his house and some 30 outbuildings. Later it came into the possession of Richard Morden Harbord-Hamond, 10th Baron Suffield (1865-1951), a Vice-Admiral in the Royal Navy, who has added a pen note at the mention of Robert Walpole, Esq., describing how some books of Walpole's wife and father-in-law came into his hands.   Ref: 22742  show full image..
£195
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Butler, William: Danish Gambit. London: Peter Owen, 1966. First edition. 8vo., pp. 167, [i]. 8vo., pp. 167, [i]. Edges slightly foxed but clean and bright within. Brown cloth, gilt title to spine. Tiny mark to front paste-down, near fine.   Ref: 49525 
£25
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Böll, Heinrich: (Vennewitz, Leila, trans.:) The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum, or: How Violence Develops and Where It Can Lead New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1975. First US edition. 8vo., pp. 140, [iv]. Black cloth, gilt title to spine, red and gilt title label to upper board, top edge red, near fine. Originally published in German as Die Verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum, oder: Wie Gevalt Entstehen und Wohin Sie Führen Kann by Kiepenheuer & Witsch, Cologne, 1974.   Ref: 51647 
£20
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Caesar, Gaius Julius: (Edmonds, Clement, ed.:) The Commentaries of C. Julius Caesar, of his Wars in Gallia; and the Civil Wars betwixt him and Pompey. With many excellent and judicious observations thereupon. As also the art of our modern training. [...] To this edition is now added, at the end of every book, those excellent remarks of the Duke of Rohan. Also the commentaries of the Alexandrian and [London] in the Savoy: printed by Edward Jones, for Matthew Gillyflower [...] and Richard Bently, 1695. Folio, pp.[xliv], 309, [i] + 15 plates in total, including frontispiece and 9 folding plates. Title-page in red and black. A little very light dampstaining just visible at tail edge of first 10 leaves approx., a few very light paper repairs to edges of first 4 leaves, frontis slightly toned with some light transfer to title. Contemporary brown speckled calf, raised bands to spine, edges sprinkled red. Neatly rebacked with spine label, corners repaired. Rubbed, scuffed, edges worn and a little chipped. Still a very good copy overall. To the front paste-down and repeated on the ffep, 'of Lewis in June 1729 - £:0:5:0' with some initials beneath, possibly W.R.L.. Also to the ffep, signature of Frank K Jewison. Eight lines of seemingly original verse to the initial blank. 'The conduct of war was prominent among Edmondes's (1567/8?–1622) interests. He urged the necessity for soldiers to read about and discuss the practice of their profession, to supplement their practical experience. He was encouraged by Sir John Scott to undertake an explanatory study of Caesar's Commentaries, published in 1600 as Observations, upon the Five First Bookes of Caesar's Commentaries and followed in the same year by Observations on the Sixth and Seventh Books. Edmondes explained that the work was directed at English soldiers and he supplemented his comments on Roman military practice with observations on contemporary campaigns, including those of the English forces in France and the war in Ireland, as well as the battle of Dreux of 1562 between the royal army and protestant forces in France. He also discussed the question of how to deal with an invasion of England, whether to oppose an invading army at the coast or to withdraw and offer battle later. His preference was to fortify the coast of Kent and oppose a landing. As well as military matters, he included an explanation of the causes of tides. [...] Thomas Fuller regarded him as an example of an author who achieved 'perfection of theory' in writing on military matters without having practical experience.' (ODNB). Edmund's Caesar was popular throughout the 17th century, being reprinted in 1655 and 1677 before this edition of 1695 appeared. Accordinging to Lathrop, 'it has no literary quality, either the springing, elastic energy of the original, or any compensatory power or grace. It does, however, do its pedestrian duty of communicating information accurately and clearly, though clumsily.' An early example of the commercial success of a bestseller defying critical judgement. ESTC R22982; Lathrop 247-9   Ref: 48621  show full image..
£1250
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Caesar, Gaius Julius: (Orsini, Fulvio, ed.:) [Opera Omnia] Rerum Ab Se Gestarum Commentarii. Quae hoc volumine continentur, & quid huic editioni accesserit, sequens pagella indicabit. Lugduni [Lyon]: (Jacques Roussin), 1626. 12mo., pp. (xxxii), 879, (lxxvii) + 2 fold-out woodcut maps. Three further woodcut illustrations to text, occasional headpieces, printer's device to title page. Foxed and sporadically toned with pp. 481-518 being particularly affected, paper flaw to p.529 resulting in hole to roughly three lines of text each side, another paper flaw to p.69 not affecting text. Contemporary semi-limp vellum, yapp fore-edges, blind ruled spine and borders, ink title to spine, faint ink ownership inscription in an old hand to upper board. A little darkened, stain to upper board, ties lost. Ownership inscription to front of upper board, ' Ex Libris Christopher Sonnenberg' followed by a few further illegible words. Remains of erased pencil notes to f.f.e.p. Likely a licenced, or perhaps pirated, copy of the early Aldine edition, and a rare printing. Not found on COPAC and apparently unseen by either Dibdin or Schweiger, Worldcat has two records for the edition but neither seem to be associated with any actual physical holdings.   Ref: 48577 
£500
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Campbell, Thomas: The Pleasures of Hope, with Other Poems. Edinburgh: printed for Mundell, Doig, & Stevenson; London: J. Murray, 1808. 9th edition. 8vo., pp. [vi], 134, 17, [i] + 4 plates. Sporadic foxing largely affecting plates. Contemporary tan tree calf, gilt double-lines to spine, traces of missing label. Upper joint splitting but cords holding firm, Spine rubbed and a bit chipped but still good overall. Ownership inscription to title-page: 'Letitia Prichard's, October 10th 1814'. On 27 April 1799 Mundell published Campbell's The Pleasures of Hope. It was an immediate success, and created eager expectations of future greatness. [...] The poem's popularity is an indication of the prevailing taste, still far more at ease with eighteenth-century didactic poetry than with the innovations of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. But the poem was also fortunate in its timing. It was peculiarly welcome to those in sympathy with political reform who were at their most despondent over the bloodshed of the French Revolution. Campbell's poem found ways of asserting radical sentiments that avoided the deadly charge of association with 'French principles'. He denounced the destroyers of Polish liberty, and breathed vengeance on the oppressors of India and supporters of the slave trade. A second part was equally welcome in its rejection of a scepticism that reduced humanity to a 'frail and feverish being of an hour' (The Pleasures of Hope, line 338). But Campbell never had confidence that he could sustain the reputation thus early established. He was unable to develop his next poetical project, a celebration of Edinburgh to be called 'The Queen of the North', beyond a few fragments.' (ODNB)   Ref: 51823 
£40
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